Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor Purpose This study evaluated a novel method for characterizing jaw rotation using orientation data from a single electromagnetic articulography sensor. This method was optimized for clinical application, and a preliminary examination of clinical feasibility and value was undertaken. Method The computational adequacy of the single-sensor orientation method was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeff Berry
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
  • Andrew Kolb
    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
  • James Schroeder
    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
  • Michael T. Johnson
    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jeff Berry: jeffrey.berry@marquette.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Donald Robin
    Associate Editor: Donald Robin×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 596-610. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0104
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised October 18, 2016 , Accepted December 22, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 596-610. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0104
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised October 18, 2016; Accepted December 22, 2016

Purpose This study evaluated a novel method for characterizing jaw rotation using orientation data from a single electromagnetic articulography sensor. This method was optimized for clinical application, and a preliminary examination of clinical feasibility and value was undertaken.

Method The computational adequacy of the single-sensor orientation method was evaluated through comparisons of jaw-rotation histories calculated from dual-sensor positional data for 16 typical talkers. The clinical feasibility and potential value of single-sensor jaw rotation were assessed through comparisons of 7 talkers with dysarthria and 19 typical talkers in connected speech.

Results The single-sensor orientation method allowed faster and safer participant preparation, required lower data-acquisition costs, and generated less high-frequency artifact than the dual-sensor positional approach. All talkers with dysarthria, regardless of severity, demonstrated jaw-rotation histories with more numerous changes in movement direction and reduced smoothness compared with typical talkers.

Conclusions Results suggest that the single-sensor orientation method for calculating jaw rotation during speech is clinically feasible. Given the preliminary nature of this study and the small participant pool, the clinical value of such measures remains an open question. Further work must address the potential confound of reduced speaking rate on movement smoothness.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported with funding provided by National Science Foundation Grant NSF IIS-1320892 (awarded to Johnson and Berry), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation's 2011 New Century Scholars Research Grant (awarded to Berry), and the Marquette Regular Research Grant (awarded to Berry and Johnson). Portions of this work were presented at the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech.
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