Internally Versus Externally Cued Speech in Parkinson's Disease and Cerebellar Disease Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an internally versus externally cued speech task on perceived understandability and naturalness in speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebellar disease (CD). Method Sentences extracted from a covertly recorded conversation (internally cued) were compared to the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Internally Versus Externally Cued Speech in Parkinson's Disease and Cerebellar Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phil Weir-Mayta
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Fullerton
  • Kristie A. Spencer
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Tanya L. Eadie
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Sara Savaglio
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Chris Woollcott
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Phil Weir-Mayta: pweir-mayta@fullerton.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Michael Hammer
    Associate Editor: Michael Hammer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Internally Versus Externally Cued Speech in Parkinson's Disease and Cerebellar Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 583-595. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0109
History: Received June 16, 2016 , Revised October 3, 2016 , Accepted March 15, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 583-595. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0109
History: Received June 16, 2016; Revised October 3, 2016; Accepted March 15, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an internally versus externally cued speech task on perceived understandability and naturalness in speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebellar disease (CD).

Method Sentences extracted from a covertly recorded conversation (internally cued) were compared to the same sentences read aloud (externally cued) by speakers with PD and a clinical comparison group of speakers with CD. Experienced listeners rated the speech samples using a visual analog scale for the perceptual dimensions of understandability and naturalness.

Results Results suggest that experienced listeners rated the speech of participants with PD as significantly more natural and more understandable during the reading condition. Participants with CD were also rated as significantly more understandable during the reading condition, but ratings of naturalness did not differ between conversation and reading.

Conclusions Speech tasks can have a pronounced impact on perceived speech patterns. For individuals with PD, both understandability and naturalness can improve during reading tasks versus conversational tasks. The speech benefits from reading may be attributed to several mechanisms, including possible improvement from an externally cued speech task. These findings have implications for speech task selection in evaluating individuals with dysarthria.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants T32 DC000033 and a doctoral training fellowship sponsored by the University of Washington Retirement Association (awarded to Dr. Phil Weir-Mayta). The authors gratefully acknowledge all participants for their contributions to this study.
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