Speech Versus Speaking: The Experiences of People With Parkinson's Disease and Implications for Intervention Purpose In this project, we explore the experiences of people who report speech changes associated with Parkinson's disease as they describe taking part in everyday communication situations and report impressions related to speech treatment. Method Twenty-four community-dwelling adults with Parkinson's disease took part in face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Qualitative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Speech Versus Speaking: The Experiences of People With Parkinson's Disease and Implications for Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Carolyn Baylor
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Deanna Britton
    Portland State University, OR
    Northwest Clinic for Voice and Swallowing, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kathryn Yorkston: yorkston@u.washington.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Editor: Nancy Solomon×
  • Associate Editor: Angela Dietsch
    Associate Editor: Angela Dietsch×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Clinical Science and Implications / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Speech Versus Speaking: The Experiences of People With Parkinson's Disease and Implications for Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 561-568. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0087
History: Received May 31, 2016 , Revised September 6, 2016 , Accepted November 6, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 561-568. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0087
History: Received May 31, 2016; Revised September 6, 2016; Accepted November 6, 2016

Purpose In this project, we explore the experiences of people who report speech changes associated with Parkinson's disease as they describe taking part in everyday communication situations and report impressions related to speech treatment.

Method Twenty-four community-dwelling adults with Parkinson's disease took part in face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Qualitative research methods were used to code and develop themes related to the interviews.

Results Two major themes emerged. The first, called “speaking,” included several subthemes: thinking about speaking, weighing value versus effort, feelings associated with speaking, the environmental context of speaking, and the impact of Parkinson's disease on speaking. The second theme involved “treatment experiences” and included subthemes: choosing not to have treatment, the clinician, drills and exercise, and suggestions for change.

Conclusions From the perspective of participants with Parkinson's disease, speaking is an activity requiring both physical and cognitive effort that takes place in a social context. Although many report positive experiences with speech treatment, some reported dissatisfaction with speech drills and exercises and a lack of focus on the social aspects of communication. Suggestions for improvement include increased focus on the cognitive demands of speaking and on the psychosocial aspects of communication.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R01DC012510-01A1 awarded to C. Baylor.
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