Modeling Alphabet Skills as Instructive Feedback Within a Phonological Awareness Intervention Purpose This study evaluated the efficacy of an instructive feedback strategy for modeling letter names and sounds during presentation of positive feedback within a small-group phonological awareness intervention for preschoolers. Method Two experiments were conducted using multiple-baseline designs across children and behaviors. Letter name and sound identification and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 31, 2017
Modeling Alphabet Skills as Instructive Feedback Within a Phonological Awareness Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arnold Olszewski
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Xigrid Soto
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Howard Goldstein
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Disclosure : Howard Goldstein is the author of PAth to Literacy, which is a supplemental preschool curriculum described in this article. He has a financial interest, as he receives royalties from sales of this product through the publisher Brookes. This interest has been reviewed by the university in accordance with its Individual Conflict of Interest policy, for the purpose of maintaining the objectivity and the integrity of research at the University of South Florida. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure : Howard Goldstein is the author of PAth to Literacy, which is a supplemental preschool curriculum described in this article. He has a financial interest, as he receives royalties from sales of this product through the publisher Brookes. This interest has been reviewed by the university in accordance with its Individual Conflict of Interest policy, for the purpose of maintaining the objectivity and the integrity of research at the University of South Florida. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Arnold Olszewski, who is now at Miami University, Oxford, OH: olszewak@miamioh.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Wolter
    Associate Editor: Julie Wolter×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 31, 2017
Modeling Alphabet Skills as Instructive Feedback Within a Phonological Awareness Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 769-790. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0042
History: Received March 23, 2016 , Revised August 29, 2016 , Accepted December 13, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 769-790. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0042
History: Received March 23, 2016; Revised August 29, 2016; Accepted December 13, 2016

Purpose This study evaluated the efficacy of an instructive feedback strategy for modeling letter names and sounds during presentation of positive feedback within a small-group phonological awareness intervention for preschoolers.

Method Two experiments were conducted using multiple-baseline designs across children and behaviors. Letter name and sound identification and performance on a phonological awareness fluency measure served as the primary outcome variables. Six children completed Experiment 1. A progressive time delay was added to instructive feedback to elicit a response from the 9 children in the second experiment.

Results In the first experiment, 6 children demonstrated gains on phonological awareness but not alphabet knowledge. With the addition of progressive time delay in the second experiment, all 9 children demonstrated gains on letter name and sound identification as well as phonological awareness skills.

Conclusions Progressive time delay to prompt children's responses appears to bolster the effects of instructive feedback as an efficient strategy for modeling alphabet skills within a broader early literacy curriculum. Modeling alphabet skills did not detract from, and may have enhanced, phonological awareness instruction for preschoolers.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Cooperative Agreement R324C080011, the Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood, from the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. This research was part of a doctoral dissertation, which partially fulfilled graduation requirements for Arnold Olszewski at the University of South Florida.
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