Teaching Transnasal Endoscopy to Graduate Students Without a Hospital or Simulation Laboratory: Pool Noodles and Cadavers Purpose This study reports on a training opportunity in endoscopy in which speech-language pathology graduate students use inanimate objects and cadavers. Best practices for transnasal endoscopy in vivo require a physician to be nearby, but many graduate programs do not have this access. Method Endoscopy was offered as ... Clinical Focus
Newly Published
Clinical Focus  |   June 20, 2017
Teaching Transnasal Endoscopy to Graduate Students Without a Hospital or Simulation Laboratory: Pool Noodles and Cadavers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shari Salzhauer Berkowitz
    Program in Communication Disorders, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to: sberkowitz@mercy.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   June 20, 2017
Teaching Transnasal Endoscopy to Graduate Students Without a Hospital or Simulation Laboratory: Pool Noodles and Cadavers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0119
History: Received August 11, 2015 , Revised April 12, 2016 , Accepted February 9, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0119
History: Received August 11, 2015; Revised April 12, 2016; Accepted February 9, 2017

Purpose This study reports on a training opportunity in endoscopy in which speech-language pathology graduate students use inanimate objects and cadavers. Best practices for transnasal endoscopy in vivo require a physician to be nearby, but many graduate programs do not have this access.

Method Endoscopy was offered as a graduate elective. Students (13 women) initially learned to manipulate the endoscope through the lumen of a swimming pool noodle that was embedded with trinkets. Endoscopic examination of inanimate objects became increasingly complex, followed by endoscopic examination of a cadaver.

Results Pre- and postexamination measures and qualitative data from the 13 students revealed that students increased in confidence and in interest in this aspect of the field. All students met practical competencies for handling the endoscope, passing the endoscope on a narrow tube, and visualizing objects. Some students had the opportunity to pass the endoscope on a peer and did so successfully.

Conclusion For programs with a cadaver lab available, this protocol offers an affordable option compared with purchasing a simulator. For those with neither a cadaver lab nor a simulation lab, passing the endoscope on inanimate objects alone is beneficial to student development and learning.

Acknowledgments
This study received funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans, Grant P031M090019 awarded to Mercy College. Additional funding was provided by the Communication Disorders program at Mercy College. Special thanks go to Judith Christopher for helping to plan the course competencies and procedures, Craig Zalvan, MD, for inviting the students for in vivo endoscopy, and Stephen Fong and the Mercy College staff for welcoming us to the cadaver lab and setting up the cadaver for endoscopy.
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