Effect of Single-Use, Laser-Cut, Slow-Flow Nipples on Respiration and Milk Ingestion in Preterm Infants Purpose Single-use, laser-cut, slow-flow nipples were evaluated for their effect on respiration and milk ingestion in 13 healthy preterm infants (32.7–37.1 weeks postmenstrual age) under nonlaboratory, clinical conditions. Method The primary outcomes of minute ventilation and overall milk transfer were measured by using integrated nasal airflow and volume-calibrated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 15, 2017
Effect of Single-Use, Laser-Cut, Slow-Flow Nipples on Respiration and Milk Ingestion in Preterm Infants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katlyn E. McGrattan
    Department of Health Sciences and Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • David H. McFarland
    Faculties of Medicine, Université de Montréal and McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Jesse C. Dean
    Department of Health Sciences and Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Elizabeth Hill
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • David R. White
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Bonnie Martin-Harris
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Katlyn E. McGrattan: katlyn.mcgrattan@northwestern.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 15, 2017
Effect of Single-Use, Laser-Cut, Slow-Flow Nipples on Respiration and Milk Ingestion in Preterm Infants
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 832-839. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0052
History: Received April 11, 2016 , Revised September 20, 2016 , Accepted January 29, 2017
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2017, Vol. 26, 832-839. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0052
History: Received April 11, 2016; Revised September 20, 2016; Accepted January 29, 2017

Purpose Single-use, laser-cut, slow-flow nipples were evaluated for their effect on respiration and milk ingestion in 13 healthy preterm infants (32.7–37.1 weeks postmenstrual age) under nonlaboratory, clinical conditions.

Method The primary outcomes of minute ventilation and overall milk transfer were measured by using integrated nasal airflow and volume-calibrated bottles during suck bursts and suck burst breaks during slow-flow and standard-flow nipple bottle feedings. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests were used to test the effect of nipple type on both outcomes.

Results Prefeeding minute ventilation decreased significantly during suck bursts and returned to baseline values during suck burst breaks across both slow-flow and standard-flow nipples. No differences were found in minute ventilation (p > .40) or overall milk transfer (p = .58) between slow-flow and standard-flow nipples.

Conclusions The lack of difference in primary outcomes between the single-use slow-flow and standard-flow nipples may reflect variability in nipple properties among nipples produced by the same manufacturer. Future investigations examining the effect of both single-use and reusable nipple products are warranted to better guide nipple selection during clinical care.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant 1K24DC12801, PI: Bonnie Martin-Harris, Medical University of South Carolina), the South Carolina Clinical Translational Research Institution (Grant UL1TR000062, PI: Katlyn McGrattan, Medical University of South Carolina), and the Mark and Evelyn Trammell Trust. The research team acknowledges and thanks the neonatal nurses and the parents of the participating infants, without whom this work would not be possible.
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