The Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching With Phonological Emphasis on the Speech and Language Skills of Young Children With Cleft Palate: A Pilot Study Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the extent to which a naturalistic communication intervention, enhanced milieu teaching with phonological emphasis (EMT+ PE), improved the language and speech outcomes of toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). Method Nineteen children between 15 and 36 months ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   June 06, 2017
The Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching With Phonological Emphasis on the Speech and Language Skills of Young Children With Cleft Palate: A Pilot Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann P. Kaiser
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Nancy J. Scherer
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Jennifer R. Frey
    The George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Megan Y. Roberts
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ann P. Kaiser: ann.kaiser@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley
    Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 06, 2017
The Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching With Phonological Emphasis on the Speech and Language Skills of Young Children With Cleft Palate: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0008
History: Received January 14, 2016 , Revised August 10, 2016 , Accepted December 28, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0008
History: Received January 14, 2016; Revised August 10, 2016; Accepted December 28, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the extent to which a naturalistic communication intervention, enhanced milieu teaching with phonological emphasis (EMT+ PE), improved the language and speech outcomes of toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P).

Method Nineteen children between 15 and 36 months (M = 25 months) with nonsyndromic CL/P and typical cognitive development were randomly assigned to a treatment (EMT+PE) or nontreatment, business-as-usual (BAU), experimental condition. Participants in the treatment group received forty-eight 30-min sessions, biweekly during a 6-month period. Treatment was delivered in a university clinic by trained speech language pathologists; fidelity of treatment was high across participants.

Results Children in the treatment group had significantly better receptive language scores and a larger percentage of consonants correct than children in the BAU group at the end of intervention. Children in the treatment group made greater gains than children in the BAU group on most language measures; however, only receptive language, expressive vocabulary (per parent report), and consonants correct were significant.

Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that EMT+PE is a promising early intervention for young children with CL/P. Replication with a larger sample and long-term follow-up measures are needed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 1R21DCOO9654 and by support to the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences UL1 TR000445. This research was conducted at Vanderbilt University and East Tennessee State University.
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