Validation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale for Jamaican Creole-Speaking Preschoolers Purpose To describe validation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS; McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012a) and ICS–Jamaican Creole (ICS-JC; McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012b) in a sample of typically developing 3- to 6-year-old Jamaicans. Method One-hundred and forty-five preschooler–parent dyads participated in the study. Parents completed the ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   May 23, 2017
Validation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale for Jamaican Creole-Speaking Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karla N. Washington
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Megan M. McDonald
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Sharynne McLeod
    Research Institute for Professional Practice, Learning, and Education (RIPPLE), Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
  • Kathryn Crowe
    Research Institute for Professional Practice, Learning, and Education (RIPPLE), Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
  • Hubert Devonish
    Department of Language, Linguistics and Philosophy, University of the West Indies Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Karla N. Washington: washink2@ucmail.uc.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley
    Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 23, 2017
Validation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale for Jamaican Creole-Speaking Preschoolers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0103
History: Received July 31, 2015 , Revised January 31, 2016 , Accepted November 15, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0103
History: Received July 31, 2015; Revised January 31, 2016; Accepted November 15, 2016

Purpose To describe validation of the Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS; McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012a) and ICS–Jamaican Creole (ICS-JC; McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012b) in a sample of typically developing 3- to 6-year-old Jamaicans.

Method One-hundred and forty-five preschooler–parent dyads participated in the study. Parents completed the 7-item ICS (n = 145) and ICS-JC (n = 98) to rate children's speech intelligibility (5-point scale) across communication partners (parents, immediate family, extended family, friends, acquaintances, strangers). Preschoolers completed the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology (DEAP; Dodd, Hua, Crosbie, Holm, & Ozanne, 2006) in English and Jamaican Creole to establish speech-sound competency. For this sample, we examined validity and reliability (interrater, test–rest, internal consistency) evidence using measures of speech-sound production: (a) percentage of consonants correct, (b) percentage of vowels correct, and (c) percentage of phonemes correct.

Results ICS and ICS-JC ratings showed preschoolers were always (5) to usually (4) understood across communication partners (ICS, M = 4.43; ICS-JC, M = 4.50). Both tools demonstrated excellent internal consistency (α = .91), high interrater, and test–retest reliability. Significant correlations between the two tools and between each measure and language-specific percentage of consonants correct, percentage of vowels correct, and percentage of phonemes correct provided criterion-validity evidence. A positive correlation between the ICS and age further strengthened validity evidence for that measure.

Conclusions Both tools show promising evidence of reliability and validity in describing functional speech intelligibility for this group of typically developing Jamaican preschoolers.

Acknowledgments
This research was financially supported by: (1) Vice President for Research, University of Cincinnati (UC) Start-up Funds, College of Allied Health Sciences International Student Experience Grant, an Endowment to the Jamaican Creole Education Abroad and Research Project, and a UC International Block Grant to Karla N. Washington; (2) the Students Pursuing Academic Research Careers (SPARC) Award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) awarded to Megan M. McDonald; and (3) the Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT0990588) awarded to Sharynne McLeod. The authors would like to acknowledge the support and contributions of Professor Maureen Samms-Vaughan; research speech-language pathologists Professors Suzanne Boyce, Nancy Creaghead, and Carolyn Sotto; research assistants Lauren Mikhail, Maggie Gilmore, and Sarah Verdon; students who assisted in data collection, the parents, preschoolers, teachers, staff, and school principals who made this study possible; and the Jamaican Language Unit. Last, the authors thank Professors Laura Kretschmer and Richard Kretschmer for their commitment to the project.
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