Cotreatment as a Vehicle for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: Physical Therapists and Speech-Language Pathologists Collaborating in the Care of Children With Severe Disabilities Purpose This article defines interprofessional collaborative practice and links its key features with accepted practice conceptualizations of physical therapy. Cotreatment with speech-language pathology is described as a vehicle for interprofessional collaborative practice for children with severe disabilities. Method The article reviews the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 17, 2017
Cotreatment as a Vehicle for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: Physical Therapists and Speech-Language Pathologists Collaborating in the Care of Children With Severe Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lorraine Sylvester
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City
  • Billy T. Ogletree
    Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
  • Karen Lunnen
    Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lorraine Sylvester: lorraine-sylvester@ouhsc.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: F. Aileen Costigan
    Associate Editor: F. Aileen Costigan×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Forum: Interprofessional Collaborative Practices in Service Delivery for Individuals With Severe Disabilities
Clinical Focus   |   May 17, 2017
Cotreatment as a Vehicle for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: Physical Therapists and Speech-Language Pathologists Collaborating in the Care of Children With Severe Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 206-216. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0179
History: Received November 17, 2015 , Revised May 31, 2016 , Accepted July 6, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 206-216. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0179
History: Received November 17, 2015; Revised May 31, 2016; Accepted July 6, 2016

Purpose This article defines interprofessional collaborative practice and links its key features with accepted practice conceptualizations of physical therapy. Cotreatment with speech-language pathology is described as a vehicle for interprofessional collaborative practice for children with severe disabilities.

Method The article reviews the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (WHO, 2015) and the Hypothesis-Oriented Algorithm for Clinicians II (Rothstein, Echternach, & Riddle, 2003) as existing service-delivery frameworks in physical therapy and discusses how interprofessional collaborative practice between speech-language pathologists and physical therapists can be useful within these practice guidelines.

Results A case illustration featuring interprofessional collaborative practice during cotreatment for a child with severe disabilities through physical therapy and speech-language pathology showed more seamless care and better progress in the pursuit of three main goals: physical movement, communication of needs, and participation in classroom activities.

Conclusions Interprofessional collaborative practice is supported as a recommended practice methodology for physical therapists and speech-language pathologists serving persons with severe disabilities.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the experiences and contributions of the many children and adults with severe disabilities who have communication disorders, their families, and the related services providers who formed the basis for this article by providing us with their interprofessional collaboration. My sincere thanks Bill Ogletree and Karen Lunnen for their dedication and contribution of their respective talents to complete this interprofessional product. Finally, we wish to thank the National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons with Severe Disabilities for their support of this project.
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