Comprehensive Literacy Instruction, Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, and Students With Severe Disabilities Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus article is to briefly describe comprehensive emergent and conventional literacy instruction for students with severe disabilities. Specific attention is given to interprofessional collaborative practice and the roles of team members in planning and delivering instruction. Method A rationale for the delivery ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 17, 2017
Comprehensive Literacy Instruction, Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, and Students With Severe Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen A. Erickson
    Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Karen A. Erickson: erickson@unc.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Billy T. Ogletree
    Associate Editor: Billy T. Ogletree×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Clinical Forum: Interprofessional Collaborative Practices in Service Delivery for Individuals With Severe Disabilities
Clinical Focus   |   May 17, 2017
Comprehensive Literacy Instruction, Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, and Students With Severe Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 193-205. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0067
History: Received May 28, 2015 , Revised October 23, 2015 , Accepted January 9, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 193-205. doi:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-15-0067
History: Received May 28, 2015; Revised October 23, 2015; Accepted January 9, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus article is to briefly describe comprehensive emergent and conventional literacy instruction for students with severe disabilities. Specific attention is given to interprofessional collaborative practice and the roles of team members in planning and delivering instruction.

Method A rationale for the delivery of comprehensive instruction that balances skill and meaning emphases is provided with reference to new college and career readiness standards, the literature on literacy acquisition for students without disabilities, and, when possible, the literature on literacy acquisition for students with severe disabilities. Specific instructional approaches are presented to demonstrate how teams can actively engage students with severe disabilities in instruction that is collaborative, participatory, and interactive.

Results/Conclusions Successful provision of comprehensive literacy instruction that allows students with severe disabilities to achieve conventional literacy takes time and the efforts of a collaborative interprofessional team. Speech-language pathologists play a critical role on these teams as they ensure that students with severe disabilities have the language and communication supports they need to be successful.

Acknowledgment
I would like to thank David Koppenhaver and my current and former colleagues at the Center for Literacy & Disability Studies for the contributions they have made to the ideas presented in this article.
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