Discourse Characteristics in Aphasia Beyond the Western Aphasia Battery Cutoff Purpose This study examined discourse characteristics of individuals with aphasia who scored at or above the 93.8 cutoff on the Aphasia Quotient subtests of the Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (WAB-R; Kertesz, 2007). They were compared with participants without aphasia and those with anomic aphasia. Method Participants were from the ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   May 15, 2017
Discourse Characteristics in Aphasia Beyond the Western Aphasia Battery Cutoff
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Davida Fromm
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Margaret Forbes
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Sarah Grace Dalton
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Jessica Richardson
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Brian MacWhinney
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Davida Fromm: fromm@andrew.cmu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 15, 2017
Discourse Characteristics in Aphasia Beyond the Western Aphasia Battery Cutoff
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0071
History: Received May 3, 2016 , Revised September 6, 2016 , Accepted November 29, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0071
History: Received May 3, 2016; Revised September 6, 2016; Accepted November 29, 2016

Purpose This study examined discourse characteristics of individuals with aphasia who scored at or above the 93.8 cutoff on the Aphasia Quotient subtests of the Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (WAB-R; Kertesz, 2007). They were compared with participants without aphasia and those with anomic aphasia.

Method Participants were from the AphasiaBank database and included 28 participants who were not aphasic by WAB-R score (NABW), 92 participants with anomic aphasia, and 177 controls. Cinderella narratives were analyzed using the Computerized Language Analysis programs (MacWhinney, 2000). Outcome measures were words per minute, percent word errors, lexical diversity using the moving average type–token ratio (Covington, 2007b), main concept production, number of utterances, mean length of utterance, and proposition density.

Results Results showed that the NABW group was significantly different from the controls on all measures except MLU and proposition density. These individuals were compared to participants without aphasia and those with anomic aphasia.

Conclusion Individuals with aphasia who score above the WAB-R Aphasia Quotient cutoff demonstrate discourse impairments that warrant both treatment and special attention in the research literature.

Acknowledgment
This work was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01-DC008524 (2012–2017), awarded to Brian MacWhinney.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access