How Much Information Do People With Aphasia Convey via Gesture? Purpose People with aphasia (PWA) face significant challenges in verbally expressing their communicative intentions. Different types of gestures are produced spontaneously by PWA, and a potentially compensatory function of these gestures has been discussed. The current study aimed to investigate how much information PWA communicate through 3 types of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 17, 2017
How Much Information Do People With Aphasia Convey via Gesture?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carola de Beer
    Department of Linguistics and Literature Science, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany
    Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Cologne, Germany
  • Marcella Carragher
    Rose Aphasia Lab, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
    Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation (CCRE), University of Brisbane, Australia
  • Karin van Nispen
    Department of Communication and Information Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands
  • Katharina Hogrefe
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group (EKN), Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Jan P. de Ruiter
    Departments of Psychology and Computer Science, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts
  • Miranda L. Rose
    Rose Aphasia Lab, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
    Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation (CCRE), University of Brisbane, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Carola de Beer: carola.de_beer@uni-bielefeld.de
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 17, 2017
How Much Information Do People With Aphasia Convey via Gesture?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 483-497. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0027
History: Received March 27, 2015 , Revised September 14, 2015 , Accepted March 15, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 483-497. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0027
History: Received March 27, 2015; Revised September 14, 2015; Accepted March 15, 2016

Purpose People with aphasia (PWA) face significant challenges in verbally expressing their communicative intentions. Different types of gestures are produced spontaneously by PWA, and a potentially compensatory function of these gestures has been discussed. The current study aimed to investigate how much information PWA communicate through 3 types of gesture and the communicative effectiveness of such gestures.

Method Listeners without language impairment rated the information content of short video clips taken from PWA in conversation. Listeners were asked to rate communication within a speech-only condition and a gesture + speech condition.

Results The results revealed that the participants' interpretations of the communicative intentions expressed in the clips of PWA were significantly more accurate in the gesture + speech condition for all tested gesture types.

Conclusion It was concluded that all 3 gesture types under investigation contributed to the expression of semantic meaning communicated by PWA. Gestures are an important communicative means for PWA and should be regarded as such by their interlocutors. Gestures have been shown to enhance listeners' interpretation of PWA's overall communication.

Acknowledgments
Carola de Beer was funded by a short-term PhD scholarship of the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service). Katharina Hogrefe was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG GO 968/3-3). Karin van Nispen was funded by the Jo Kolk Study Fund. Further acknowledgments go to Dr. Kazuki Sekine and Dr. Annett Jorschick for supporting the statistical analysis, to Dr. Abby Foster and Dr. Lucy Knox for their support in the preparatory phase of the experiment, and to the lecturers of the School of Allied Health at La Trobe University who helped with participant recruitment.
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