Consonant Acquisition in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Their Typically Developing Peers Purpose Consonant acquisition was examined in 13 young cochlear implant (CI) recipients and 11 typically developing (TD) children. Method A longitudinal research design was implemented to determine the rate and nature of consonant acquisition during the first 2 years of robust hearing experience. Twenty-minute adult–child (typically a parent) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 17, 2017
Consonant Acquisition in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Their Typically Developing Peers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suneeti Nathani Iyer
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Jongmin Jung
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • David J. Ertmer
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Suneeti Nathani Iyer: snathani@uga.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Lynn Williams
    Associate Editor: Lynn Williams×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 17, 2017
Consonant Acquisition in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Their Typically Developing Peers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 413-427. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0073
History: Received May 5, 2016 , Revised October 4, 2016 , Accepted November 4, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 413-427. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0073
History: Received May 5, 2016; Revised October 4, 2016; Accepted November 4, 2016

Purpose Consonant acquisition was examined in 13 young cochlear implant (CI) recipients and 11 typically developing (TD) children.

Method A longitudinal research design was implemented to determine the rate and nature of consonant acquisition during the first 2 years of robust hearing experience. Twenty-minute adult–child (typically a parent) interactions were video and audio recorded at 3-month intervals following implantation until 24 months of robust hearing experience was achieved. TD children were similarly recorded between 6 and 24 months of age. Consonants that were produced twice within a 50-utterance sample were considered “established” within a child's consonant inventory.

Results Although the groups showed similar trajectories, the CI group produced larger consonant inventories than the TD group at each interval except for 21 and 24 months. A majority of children with CIs also showed more rapid acquisition of consonants and more diverse consonant inventories than TD children.

Conclusions These results suggest that early auditory deprivation does not significantly affect consonant acquisition for most CI recipients. Tracking early consonant development appears to be a useful way to assess the effectiveness of cochlear implantation in young recipients.

Acknowledgments
This study was made possible by a grant from the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to the third author (Grant R01DC007863). We would like to thank the parents and the participating children for their involvement and dedication. The contributions of the faculties of Child's Voice school (Wood Dale, IL), The Moog Center (Chesterfield, MO), Ohio Valley Voices (Loveland, OH), and St. Joseph Institute (Chesterfield, MO and Indianapolis, IN) are gratefully acknowledged. Last, we are grateful for the efforts of the research assistants who helped to collect, transcribe, and analyze the data presented in this manuscript.
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