Longitudinal Impacts of Print-Focused Read-Alouds for Children With Language Impairment Purpose Preschoolers with language impairment (LI) are prime candidates for early-literacy interventions, given their susceptibility for future reading difficulties. To date, most studies of early-literacy interventions for this population has assessed short-term impacts, with limited attention to whether initial effects are sustained over time. This study was designed to evaluate ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   April 07, 2017
Longitudinal Impacts of Print-Focused Read-Alouds for Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Jessica Logan
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Joan N. Kaderavek
    University of Toledo, Perrysburg, Ohio
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Laura M. Justice: justice.57@osu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Wolter
    Associate Editor: Julie Wolter×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   April 07, 2017
Longitudinal Impacts of Print-Focused Read-Alouds for Children With Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0200
History: Received December 28, 2015 , Revised June 23, 2016 , Accepted October 19, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0200
History: Received December 28, 2015; Revised June 23, 2016; Accepted October 19, 2016

Purpose Preschoolers with language impairment (LI) are prime candidates for early-literacy interventions, given their susceptibility for future reading difficulties. To date, most studies of early-literacy interventions for this population has assessed short-term impacts, with limited attention to whether initial effects are sustained over time. This study was designed to evaluate longitudinal impacts of print-focused read-alouds implemented by early childhood special education teachers for a clinic sample of children with LI.

Method Assessment data available for 172 children with LI were analyzed to examine their print knowledge 1-year postintervention. Measures examined children's alphabet knowledge, print concepts, and name-writing skills, which were used to derive a print-knowledge composite.

Results Results of hierarchical linear models examining children's print knowledge at 1-year postintervention showed that the effect size (d = 0.20) favoring the treatment group was similar to that observed one year prior (d = 0.21) at the end of intervention, suggesting that results did not fade over time. Results also showed that children with LI and comorbid low nonverbal cognition benefited the most from the intervention delivered 1 year earlier.

Conclusion The maintenance of short-term effects to 1-year postintervention supports the value of early childhood teachers using print-focused read-alouds to improve the early-literacy skills of children with LI in their classrooms.

Acknowledgments
The research reported herein was funded by the Institute of Education Sciences grant #R324A080037. We are grateful for the many families, children, teachers, and research staff who were involved in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access