Exploring Expressive Communication Skills in a Cross-Sectional Sample of Children and Young Adults With Angelman Syndrome Purpose This study explores data on expressive communication skills of 300 individuals aged 0.0–21.11 years with Angelman syndrome (AS). These data provide a composite portrait of communication skills in a large sample of children and young adults with this rare disorder, specifying new detailed information about expressive communication. ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   April 06, 2017
Exploring Expressive Communication Skills in a Cross-Sectional Sample of Children and Young Adults With Angelman Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily D. Quinn
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Charity Rowland
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Emily D. Quinn: Emily.d.quinn@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress
    Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   April 06, 2017
Exploring Expressive Communication Skills in a Cross-Sectional Sample of Children and Young Adults With Angelman Syndrome
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0075
History: Revised March 31, 2015 , Received June 10, 2015 , Accepted October 19, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0075
History: Revised March 31, 2015; Received June 10, 2015; Accepted October 19, 2016

Purpose This study explores data on expressive communication skills of 300 individuals aged 0.0–21.11 years with Angelman syndrome (AS). These data provide a composite portrait of communication skills in a large sample of children and young adults with this rare disorder, specifying new detailed information about expressive communication.

Method The database associated with the Communication Matrix assessment (Rowland, 2004, 2011; Rowland & Fried-Oken, 2010) was mined for data regarding individuals with AS. We extracted data on the reasons for communicating, level of communication achieved, and use of various expressive communication modes to convey 24 specific messages. The performance of children and young adults in 5 age groups in the cross-sectional sample were contrasted.

Results Results confirmed earlier studies showing that few individuals with AS use natural speech. However, in addition to using presymbolic modes, many children used alternative symbolic modes such as picture symbols, object symbols, and manual signs. Assessment scores increased slightly with age, F(4, 295) = 2.416, p = .049.

Conclusions Aggregating data on a large sample of individuals with AS provides a reference point for practitioners and family members and a basis for future investigations.

Acknowledgments
The contents of this research article were developed under Grants H327A110010 and H327S130010 from the U.S. Department of Education (awarded to Oregon Health and Science University). However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education and should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. The authors would like to thank the many family members and professionals who have participated in this research by contributing assessment data to the Communication Matrix database.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access