Assessing the Amount of Spontaneous Real-World Spoken Language in Aphasia: Validation of Two Methods Purpose The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study evaluating the psychometric properties of 2 new measures that exclusively assess the amount of real-world spoken language in patients with aphasia. Method Forty individuals with aphasia were evaluated on several measures of spoken language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 17, 2017
Assessing the Amount of Spontaneous Real-World Spoken Language in Aphasia: Validation of Two Methods
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle M. Haddad
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Edward Taub
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Gitendra Uswatte
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Margaret L. Johnson
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, Samford University, Birmingham, AL
  • Victor W. Mark
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ameen Barghi
    Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Ezekiel Byrom
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Xiaohua Zhou
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Christina M. Rodriguez
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Edward Taub: etaub@uab.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 17, 2017
Assessing the Amount of Spontaneous Real-World Spoken Language in Aphasia: Validation of Two Methods
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 316-326. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0115
History: Received August 5, 2015 , Revised May 20, 2016 , Accepted September 22, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 316-326. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0115
History: Received August 5, 2015; Revised May 20, 2016; Accepted September 22, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study evaluating the psychometric properties of 2 new measures that exclusively assess the amount of real-world spoken language in patients with aphasia.

Method Forty individuals with aphasia were evaluated on several measures of spoken language in real-world settings. The Verbal Activity Log (VAL; Johnson et al., 2014) has participants, aided by caregivers, indicate current amount and quality of real-world spoken language compared with before stroke. In addition, digital voice recorders objectively measured the amount of real-world spoken language. The Communicative Effectiveness Index (Lomas et al., 1989), a previously validated measure of functional communication, was used as a comparison measure. Nineteen participants received follow-up assessment ≥ 3 weeks later.

Results Validity was supported by Pearson correlations between spoken language recordings and the VAL, r(38) = .70, p < .001. Likewise, correlation with the Communicative Effectiveness Index was strong, r(38) = .73, p < .001. Test–retest reliability for both VAL and audio recording was high, with intraclass correlations ≥ .96 and .90, respectively.

Conclusions These results present preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of the VAL and spoken language recording for assessment of the amount of real-world spoken language in aphasia. As a simple patient-reported outcome, the VAL may assist diverse therapies for aphasia.

Acknowledgment
This research article was supported in part by American Heart Association Grant 12PRE1137002. We thank Lyn Turkstra for a critical reading of the article.
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