Comparing the Effects of Speech-Generating Device Display Organization on Symbol Comprehension and Use by Three Children With Developmental Delays Purpose Three children ages 3;6 to 5;3 with developmental and language delays were provided experience with a traditional grid-based display and a contextually organized visual scene display on a speech-generating device to illustrate considerations for practice and future research in augmentative and alternative communication assessment and intervention. Method ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 17, 2017
Comparing the Effects of Speech-Generating Device Display Organization on Symbol Comprehension and Use by Three Children With Developmental Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea Barton-Hulsey
    Department of Speech-Language Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Jane Wegner
    Department of Speech-Language Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Nancy C. Brady
    Department of Speech-Language Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Betty H. Bunce
    Department of Speech-Language Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Andrea Barton-Hulsey: abarton@gsu.edu
  • Andrea Barton-Hulsey is now in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University.
    Andrea Barton-Hulsey is now in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University.×
  • Editor: Joe Reichle
    Editor: Joe Reichle×
  • Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress
    Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 17, 2017
Comparing the Effects of Speech-Generating Device Display Organization on Symbol Comprehension and Use by Three Children With Developmental Delays
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 227-240. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0166
History: Received October 20, 2015 , Revised March 15, 2016 , Accepted September 11, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 227-240. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0166
History: Received October 20, 2015; Revised March 15, 2016; Accepted September 11, 2016

Purpose Three children ages 3;6 to 5;3 with developmental and language delays were provided experience with a traditional grid-based display and a contextually organized visual scene display on a speech-generating device to illustrate considerations for practice and future research in augmentative and alternative communication assessment and intervention.

Method Twelve symbols were taught in a grid display and visual scene display using aided input during dramatic play routines. Teaching sessions were 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Symbol comprehension and use was assessed pre and post 3 weeks of experience.

Results Comprehension of symbol vocabulary on both displays increased after 3 weeks of experience. Participants 1 and 2 used both displays largely for initiation. Participant 3 had limited expressive use of either display.

Conclusions The methods used in this study demonstrate one way to inform individual differences in learning and preference for speech-generating device displays when making clinical decisions regarding augmentative and alternative communication supports for a child and their family. Future research should systematically examine the role of extant comprehension, symbol experience, functional communication needs, and the role of vocabulary type in the learning and use of grid displays versus visual scene displays.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a Pardee Augmentative and Alternative Communication Fellowship awarded to the first author, and resources from the Pardee Augmentative and Alternative Communication Laboratory at the University of Kansas. This manuscript is based on data collected for a master's thesis by Andrea Barton-Hulsey as part of the requirements for the M.A. degree in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Kansas.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access