Does Naming Therapy Make Ordering in a Restaurant Easier? Dynamics of Co-Occurring Change in Cognitive-Linguistic and Functional Communication Skills in Aphasia Purpose This study was conducted to investigate the static and dynamic relationships between impairment-level cognitive-linguistic abilities and activity-level functional communication skills in persons with aphasia (PWA). Method In Experiment 1, a battery of standardized assessments was administered to a group of PWA (N = 72) to examine associations ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 17, 2017
Does Naming Therapy Make Ordering in a Restaurant Easier? Dynamics of Co-Occurring Change in Cognitive-Linguistic and Functional Communication Skills in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin L. Meier
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Jeffrey P. Johnson
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Sarah Villard
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Swathi Kiran
    Aphasia Research Laboratory, Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Erin L. Meier: emeier@bu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
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Research Article   |   May 17, 2017
Does Naming Therapy Make Ordering in a Restaurant Easier? Dynamics of Co-Occurring Change in Cognitive-Linguistic and Functional Communication Skills in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 266-280. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0028
History: Received February 24, 2016 , Revised July 14, 2016 , Accepted August 29, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2017, Vol. 26, 266-280. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0028
History: Received February 24, 2016; Revised July 14, 2016; Accepted August 29, 2016

Purpose This study was conducted to investigate the static and dynamic relationships between impairment-level cognitive-linguistic abilities and activity-level functional communication skills in persons with aphasia (PWA).

Method In Experiment 1, a battery of standardized assessments was administered to a group of PWA (N = 72) to examine associations between cognitive-linguistic ability and functional communication at a single time point. In Experiment 2, impairment-based treatment was administered to a subset of PWA from Experiment 1 (n = 39) in order to examine associations between change in cognitive-linguistic ability and change in function and associations at a single time point.

Results In both experiments, numerous significant associations were found between scores on tests of cognitive-linguistic ability and a test of functional communication at a single time point. In Experiment 2, significant treatment-induced gains were seen on both types of measures in participants with more severe aphasia, yet cognitive-linguistic change scores were not significantly correlated with functional communication change scores.

Conclusions At a single time point, cognitive-linguistic and functional communication abilities are associated in PWA. However, although changes on standardized assessments reflecting improvements in both types of skills can occur following an impairment-based therapy, these changes may not be significantly associated with each other.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIH/NIDCD 1P50DC012283, NIH/NIDCD R33DC010461, NIH/NIDCD 5K18DC011517-02, and the Coulter Foundation for Translational Research. Some data presented in the current study were collected during the development of the Constant Therapy software platform. Swathi Kiran is the cofounder and scientific advisor of Constant Therapy and owns stock equity in the company. Boston University also owns a portion of stock equity in Constant Therapy.
We extend our thanks to the individuals with aphasia who participated in the study. We also want to acknowledge the contributions of members of the Aphasia Research Laboratory (Boston University), with special thanks to Carrie Des Roches and Natalie Gilmore for their feedback and assistance.
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