Update on Didactic and Clinical Education in Fluency Disorders: 2013–2014 Purpose This study surveyed didactic and clinical education in fluency disorders at undergraduate and graduate institutions in the United States that provide education in speech-language pathology to determine whether a previously observed reduction in requirements has continued since prior surveys (Yaruss, 1999; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002). Method The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2017
Update on Didactic and Clinical Education in Fluency Disorders: 2013–2014
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Scott Yaruss
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Jieun Lee
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kaya B. Kikani
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Paula Leslie
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Caryn Herring
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Sujini Ramachandar
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Seth Tichenor
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Robert W. Quesal
    Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to J. Scott Yaruss: jsyaruss@pitt.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2017
Update on Didactic and Clinical Education in Fluency Disorders: 2013–2014
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2017, Vol. 26, 124-137. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0154
History: Revised April 26, 2016 , Accepted May 31, 2016 , Received September 23, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2017, Vol. 26, 124-137. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0154
History: Revised April 26, 2016; Accepted May 31, 2016; Received September 23, 2016

Purpose This study surveyed didactic and clinical education in fluency disorders at undergraduate and graduate institutions in the United States that provide education in speech-language pathology to determine whether a previously observed reduction in requirements has continued since prior surveys (Yaruss, 1999; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002).

Method The study involved a detailed questionnaire that was sent to 282 communication science and disorders departments. Questions examined didactic and clinical education, as well as faculty knowledge about fluency disorders.

Results Comparisons with prior surveys revealed several findings, including (a) on average, programs have increased academic coursework and incorporated more practical sessions and competency-based testing in the classroom; (b) the number of faculty who possess extensive clinical experience with fluency disorders has decreased; and (c) although an increase in clinical requirements in fluency disorders was detected, the number of programs providing minimal education about fluency disorders remains high.

Conclusion Given an expanding scope of practice, many programs have continued to try to provide adequate education about fluency disorders. Still, direct clinical experiences are limited, and faculty expertise in this area has continued to decrease. To raise students' confidence and competence in fluency disorders, efforts beyond graduate work—or systemic changes in the profession—may be necessary.

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