Measuring Clinician–Client Relationships in Speech-Language Treatment for School-Age Children Purpose Clinician–client relationships may influence treatment success in speech-language pathology, but there are no established tools for measuring these relationships. This study describes the development and application of a set of scales for assessing clinician–client relationships in children's speech-language treatment. Method Twenty-two triads of participants completed a longitudinal ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2017
Measuring Clinician–Client Relationships in Speech-Language Treatment for School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerry Danahy Ebert
    Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kerry Danahy Ebert: Kerry_ebert@rush.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Amanda Van Horne
    Associate Editor: Amanda Van Horne×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Notes
Research Note   |   February 01, 2017
Measuring Clinician–Client Relationships in Speech-Language Treatment for School-Age Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2017, Vol. 26, 146-152. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0018
History: Received January 28, 2016 , Revised June 24, 2016 , Accepted August 13, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2017, Vol. 26, 146-152. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0018
History: Received January 28, 2016; Revised June 24, 2016; Accepted August 13, 2016

Purpose Clinician–client relationships may influence treatment success in speech-language pathology, but there are no established tools for measuring these relationships. This study describes the development and application of a set of scales for assessing clinician–client relationships in children's speech-language treatment.

Method Twenty-two triads of participants completed a longitudinal study. Each triad had 1 school-age child enrolled in speech-language treatment, 1 caregiver, and 1 speech-language pathologist (SLP). The clinician–client relationship scales were administered to all 3 types of participants at study onset and again 2 weeks later. Treatment progress measures were collected 4 months later. Analyses established the reliability and validity of the clinician–client relationship scales.

Results Adequate internal consistency reliability and test–retest reliability were established for all 3 versions of the scale (child, caregiver, and SLP). Convergent validity was moderate between SLPs and children but lower when caregivers were included. Predictive validity analyses established significant relationships between caregiver and SLP ratings of the clinician–client relationship and future treatment progress.

Conclusions This exploratory study established the viability of the clinician–client relationship scales for further development and application. The importance of establishing and utilizing measures of the clinician–client relationship in speech-language pathology is discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by an American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Investigators Grant. The author thanks Kahla Graham and Jeni Gillenwater for assistance with data collection, the Red Cap Project for data management, and all participating speech-language pathologists and families.
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