The Effects of Self-Disclosure on Male and Female Perceptions of Individuals Who Stutter Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of self-disclosure on observers' perceptions of persons who stutter. Method Participants (N = 173) were randomly assigned to view 2 of 4 possible videos (i.e., male self-disclosure, male no self-disclosure, female self-disclosure, and female no self-disclosure). After ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   January 04, 2017
The Effects of Self-Disclosure on Male and Female Perceptions of Individuals Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney T. Byrd
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Megann McGill
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Zoi Gkalitsiou
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Colleen Cappellini
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Courtney T. Byrd: courtney.byrd@austin.utexas.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 04, 2017
The Effects of Self-Disclosure on Male and Female Perceptions of Individuals Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0164
History: Received October 21, 2015 , Revised March 18, 2016 , Accepted June 1, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0164
History: Received October 21, 2015; Revised March 18, 2016; Accepted June 1, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of self-disclosure on observers' perceptions of persons who stutter.

Method Participants (N = 173) were randomly assigned to view 2 of 4 possible videos (i.e., male self-disclosure, male no self-disclosure, female self-disclosure, and female no self-disclosure). After viewing both videos, participants completed a survey assessing their perceptions of the speakers.

Results Controlling for observer and speaker gender, listeners were more likely to select speakers who self-disclosed their stuttering as more friendly, outgoing, and confident compared with speakers who did not self-disclose. Observers were more likely to select speakers who did not self-disclose as unfriendly and shy compared with speakers who used a self-disclosure statement. Controlling for self-disclosure and observer gender, observers were less likely to choose the female speaker as friendlier, outgoing, and confident compared with the male speaker. Observers also were more likely to select the female speaker as unfriendly, shy, unintelligent, and insecure compared with the male speaker and were more likely to report that they were more distracted when viewing the videos.

Conclusion Results lend support to the effectiveness of self-disclosure as a technique that persons who stutter can use to positively influence the perceptions of listeners.

Acknowledgments
This project was completed with endowed support provided to Courtney Byrd through the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute and the Dr. Jennifer and Emanuel Bodner Developmental Stuttering Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin. We thank Elizabeth Hampton for her assistance with participant recruitment, Dr. Michael Mahometa and Sally Amen for their assistance with the statistical analyses, and most of all the adults who do and do not stutter who were willing to give their time to participate in this study and help us to further our knowledge of perceptions of stuttering.
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