Effects of a Least-to-Most Prompting Procedure on Multisymbol Message Production in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Purpose In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a least-to-most (LTM) prompting procedure (Ault & Griffen, 2013; MacDuff, Krantz, & McClannahan, 2001; Neitzel & Wolery, 2009) for increasing use of multisymbol messages in school-age children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) during a ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   January 05, 2017
Effects of a Least-to-Most Prompting Procedure on Multisymbol Message Production in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erinn H. Finke
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Jennifer M. Davis
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Morgan Benedict
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Lauren Goga
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Jennifer Kelly
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Lauren Palumbo
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Tanika Peart
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Samantha Waters
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Erinn H. Finke: enh109@psu.edu
  • Editor: Joe Reichle
    Editor: Joe Reichle×
  • Associate Editor: Laura DeThorne
    Associate Editor: Laura DeThorne×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 05, 2017
Effects of a Least-to-Most Prompting Procedure on Multisymbol Message Production in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-14-0187
History: Received October 30, 2014 , Revised May 11, 2015 , Accepted June 10, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-14-0187
History: Received October 30, 2014; Revised May 11, 2015; Accepted June 10, 2016

Purpose In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a least-to-most (LTM) prompting procedure (Ault & Griffen, 2013; MacDuff, Krantz, & McClannahan, 2001; Neitzel & Wolery, 2009) for increasing use of multisymbol messages in school-age children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) during a storybook reading activity.

Method In the study, we used a single-subject, multiple-probe research design across participants (Kazdin, 1982) with 6 children (ages 8–12) with ASD and who used AAC systems for communication. There were 4 phases in this investigation: (a) baseline, (b) intervention, (c) generalization, and (d) maintenance.

Results All participants exhibited a positive increase in multisymbol message production almost immediately upon introduction of the LTM prompting procedure.

Conclusions The results of the investigation contribute important information on the efficacy of the LTM prompting procedure for teaching use of multisymbol messages to school-age children with ASD who use AAC.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Organization for Autism Research. We are thankful for this support because the research would not have been possible without it. We also thank all of the participants, their families, as well as the administration and staff at The Vista School in Hershey, Pennsylvania, for their roles in making this research possible.
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