Core Outcomes in Aphasia Treatment Research: An e-Delphi Consensus Study of International Aphasia Researchers Purpose The purpose of this article is to identify outcome constructs that aphasia researchers consider essential to measure in all aphasia treatment research. Method Purposively sampled researchers were invited to participate in a 3-round e-Delphi exercise. In Round 1, an open-ended question was used to elicit important outcome ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2016
Core Outcomes in Aphasia Treatment Research: An e-Delphi Consensus Study of International Aphasia Researchers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah J. Wallace
    The University of Queensland, Australia
  • Linda Worrall
    The University of Queensland, Australia
  • Tanya Rose
    The University of Queensland, Australia
  • Guylaine Le Dorze
    University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Linda Worrall: l.worrall@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Christos Salis
    Associate Editor: Christos Salis×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 45th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2016
Core Outcomes in Aphasia Treatment Research: An e-Delphi Consensus Study of International Aphasia Researchers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2016, Vol. 25, S729-S742. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0150
History: Received September 20, 2015 , Revised February 28, 2016 , Accepted April 7, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2016, Vol. 25, S729-S742. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0150
History: Received September 20, 2015; Revised February 28, 2016; Accepted April 7, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this article is to identify outcome constructs that aphasia researchers consider essential to measure in all aphasia treatment research.

Method Purposively sampled researchers were invited to participate in a 3-round e-Delphi exercise. In Round 1, an open-ended question was used to elicit important outcome constructs; responses were analyzed using inductive content analysis. In Rounds 2 and 3, participants rated the importance of each outcome using a 9-point rating scale. Outcomes reaching predefined consensus criteria were further analyzed using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health coding.

Results Eighty researchers commenced Round 1, with 72 completing the entire survey. High response rates (≥ 85%) were achieved in subsequent rounds. Consensus was reached on 6 outcomes: (a) language functioning in modalities relevant to study aims, (b) impact of treatment from the perspective of the person with aphasia (PWA), (c) communication-related quality of life, (d) satisfaction with intervention from the perspective of the PWA, (e) satisfaction with ability to communicate from the perspective of the PWA, and (f) satisfaction with participation in activities from the perspective of the PWA.

Conclusions Consensus was reached that it is essential to measure language function and specific patient-reported outcomes in all aphasia treatment research. These results will contribute to the development of a core outcome set.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship awarded to Sarah J. Wallace. The authors have no other declarations of interest to report.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access