Recovering With Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The First 2 Years Purpose This study was intended to document speech recovery for 1 person with acquired apraxia of speech quantitatively and on the basis of her lived experience. Method The second author sustained a traumatic brain injury that resulted in acquired apraxia of speech. Over a 2-year period, she documented ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2016
Recovering With Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The First 2 Years
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katarina L. Haley
    Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Jennifer N. Shafer
    Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Tyson G. Harmon
    Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Adam Jacks
    Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Katarina L. Haley: Katarina_Haley@med.unc.edu
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Heather Clark
    Associate Editor: Heather Clark×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Select Papers From the 45th Clinical Aphasiology Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2016
Recovering With Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The First 2 Years
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2016, Vol. 25, S687-S696. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0143
History: Received September 15, 2015 , Revised January 20, 2016 , Accepted January 22, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2016, Vol. 25, S687-S696. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0143
History: Received September 15, 2015; Revised January 20, 2016; Accepted January 22, 2016

Purpose This study was intended to document speech recovery for 1 person with acquired apraxia of speech quantitatively and on the basis of her lived experience.

Method The second author sustained a traumatic brain injury that resulted in acquired apraxia of speech. Over a 2-year period, she documented her recovery through 22 video-recorded monologues. We analyzed these monologues using a combination of auditory perceptual, acoustic, and qualitative methods.

Results Recovery was evident for all quantitative variables examined. For speech sound production, the recovery was most prominent during the first 3 months, but slower improvement was evident for many months. Measures of speaking rate, fluency, and prosody changed more gradually throughout the entire period. A qualitative analysis of topics addressed in the monologues was consistent with the quantitative speech recovery and indicated a subjective dynamic relationship between accuracy and rate, an observation that several factors made speech sound production variable, and a persisting need for cognitive effort while speaking.

Conclusions Speech features improved over an extended time, but the recovery trajectories differed, indicating dynamic reorganization of the underlying speech production system. The relationship among speech dimensions should be examined in other cases and in population samples. The combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods offers advantages for understanding clinically relevant aspects of recovery.

Acknowledgments
We thank Stephanie Carruthers, Misty Cox, Patrick Morrison, Erin Shumate, Tayler Simonds, and Michael Smith for their help with data analysis.
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