Accuracy of Self-Reported Estimates of Daily Voice Use in Adults With Normal and Disordered Voices Purpose Accurate estimation of daily patterns of vocal behavior is essential to understanding the role of voice use in voice disorders. Given that clinicians currently rely on patient self-report to assess daily vocal behaviors, this study sought to assess the accuracy with which adults with and without voice disorders can ... Research Note
Research Note  |   November 01, 2016
Accuracy of Self-Reported Estimates of Daily Voice Use in Adults With Normal and Disordered Voices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Institute of Health Professions, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Harold A. Cheyne, II
    Bioacoustic Research Program, Lab of Ornithology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • Asa Wehner
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • James T. Heaton
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Institute of Health Professions, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Institute of Health Professions, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial interest in the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor (APM) based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R & D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM).
    Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial interest in the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor (APM) based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R & D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM). ×
  • Correspondence to Daryush D. Mehta: daryush.mehta@alum.mit.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar
    Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Notes
Research Note   |   November 01, 2016
Accuracy of Self-Reported Estimates of Daily Voice Use in Adults With Normal and Disordered Voices
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2016, Vol. 25, 634-641. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0105
History: Received July 20, 2015 , Revised January 27, 2016 , Accepted April 18, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2016, Vol. 25, 634-641. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0105
History: Received July 20, 2015; Revised January 27, 2016; Accepted April 18, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Accurate estimation of daily patterns of vocal behavior is essential to understanding the role of voice use in voice disorders. Given that clinicians currently rely on patient self-report to assess daily vocal behaviors, this study sought to assess the accuracy with which adults with and without voice disorders can estimate their amount of daily voice use in terms of phonation time.

Method Eighteen subjects (6 patients, 6 matched members of a control group without voice disorders, 6 low voice users) wore the accelerometer-based Ambulatory Phonation Monitor (APM; model 3200, KayPENTAX, Montvale, NJ) for at least 5 workdays. Subjects were instructed to provide hourly self-reports of time spent talking using a visual analog scale. Spearman correlation coefficients and errors between self-reported and APM-based estimates of phonation time revealed subject- and group-specific characteristics.

Results A majority of subjects exhibited a significant bias toward overestimating their phonation times, with an average absolute error of 113%. Correlation coefficients between self-reported and APM-based estimates of phonation time ranged from statistically nonsignificant to .91, reflecting large intersubject variability.

Conclusions Subjects in all 3 groups were moderately accurate at estimating their hourly voice use, with a consistent bias toward overestimation. The results support the potential role that ambulatory monitoring could play in improving the clinical assessment of voice disorders.

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