A Usability Study of Internet-Based Therapy for Naming Deficits in Aphasia Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the usability of delivering the Phonological Components Analysis treatment for anomia (Leonard, Rochon, & Laird, 2008) remotely via the Internet to individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. A secondary aim was to probe the experiences and satisfaction of clinicians in administering treatment at a distance. ... Research Note
Research Note  |   November 01, 2016
A Usability Study of Internet-Based Therapy for Naming Deficits in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tijana Simic
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, ON, Canada
  • Carol Leonard
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Laura Laird
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Jennifer Cupit
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Fiona Höbler
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, ON, Canada
  • Elizabeth Rochon
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, ON, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Tijana Simic: tina.simic@mail.utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Diane Kendall
    Associate Editor: Diane Kendall×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Notes
Research Note   |   November 01, 2016
A Usability Study of Internet-Based Therapy for Naming Deficits in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2016, Vol. 25, 642-653. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0030
History: Received March 28, 2015 , Revised September 30, 2015 , Accepted May 11, 2016
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2016, Vol. 25, 642-653. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0030
History: Received March 28, 2015; Revised September 30, 2015; Accepted May 11, 2016

Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the usability of delivering the Phonological Components Analysis treatment for anomia (Leonard, Rochon, & Laird, 2008) remotely via the Internet to individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. A secondary aim was to probe the experiences and satisfaction of clinicians in administering treatment at a distance.

Method Six individuals with mild–moderate aphasia and 2 trained clinicians participated in this usability study. Participants and clinicians underwent approximately 6 hr of treatment under observation by an independent observer. The usability characteristics of effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction were assessed.

Results Individuals with aphasia used the Internet-based Phonological Components Analysis therapy successfully, demonstrating independence and very few errors in completing online tasks. Overall, participant satisfaction was high, despite occasional difficulties with technical aspects of the system. Clinicians found the application easy to use but raised concerns about the participant–clinician interaction, perceiving rapport-building and communicating to be more difficult online than face-to-face.

Conclusions It is important to consider usability and the clinician's perspective in developing telepractice applications in speech-language pathology. Future directions include assessing the efficacy of remote treatment and collecting a larger sample of clinician data.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this work were presented at the Speech-Language and Audiology Canada Conference, Ottawa, Canada, May 2014 (Simic, T., Leonard, C., Laird, L., Rochon, E.), and at The Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery 12th Annual Scientific Meeting, Ottawa, Canada, June 2013 (Simic, T., Leonard, C., Laird, L., Rochon, E.). This research was supported by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery. We thank Dwayne Hammond and Algoma Games for Health for assistance with this project. We especially thank the participants for their patience and perseverance, and we thank the referring clinicians at the Aphasia Institute and the March of Dimes Aphasia and Communication Disabilities Program.
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