The Client's Perspective on Voluntary Stuttering Purpose Voluntary stuttering is a strategy that has been suggested for use in the clinical literature but has minimal empirical data regarding treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present study is to explore client perspectives regarding the impact of the use of this strategy on the affective, behavioral, and cognitive ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2016
The Client's Perspective on Voluntary Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney T. Byrd
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Zoi Gkalitsiou
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Joe Donaher
    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA
  • Erin Stergiou
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Courtney T. Byrd: courtney.byrd@austin.utexas.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage
    Associate Editor: Shelley Brundage×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2016
The Client's Perspective on Voluntary Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 290-305. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0018
History: Received February 19, 2015 , Revised July 15, 2015 , Accepted December 16, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 290-305. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0018
History: Received February 19, 2015; Revised July 15, 2015; Accepted December 16, 2015

Purpose Voluntary stuttering is a strategy that has been suggested for use in the clinical literature but has minimal empirical data regarding treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present study is to explore client perspectives regarding the impact of the use of this strategy on the affective, behavioral, and cognitive components of stuttering.

Method The present study used an original survey designed to explore the intended purpose. A total of 206 adults who stutter were included in the final data corpus. Responses were considered with respect to the type of voluntary stuttering the participants reportedly produced and the location of use.

Results A client perceives significantly greater affective, behavioral, and cognitive benefits from voluntary stuttering when the production is closely matched to the client's actual stutter and when it is used outside the clinical environment.

Conclusions To enhance client perception of associated benefits, clinicians should encourage use of voluntary stuttering that closely matches the client's own stuttering. Clinicians should also facilitate practice of voluntary stuttering outside of the therapy room. Finally, clinicians should be aware that clients, at least initially, may not perceive any benefits from the use of this strategy.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge the endowed support provided by the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute and the Jennifer and Emanuel Bodner Developmental Stuttering Laboratory. We would also like to thank Elizabeth Hampton as well as Geoff Coalson and Jeff Loeb, who assisted with the final version of the survey. We would also like to thank Michael Mahometa for his assistance with the statistical analyses. In addition, we would like to thank the clinicians who shared our survey link with their present and past clients who stutter. Most of all, we would like to thank the adults who stutter who were willing to give their time to participate in this study and help us to further our knowledge of the underlying nature of stuttering.
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