The Effect of Noise on Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Self-Reported Communication Measures in Tracheoesophageal Speakers Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how sentence intelligibility relates to self-reported communication in tracheoesophageal speakers when speech intelligibility is measured in quiet and noise. Method Twenty-four tracheoesophageal speakers who were at least 1 year postlaryngectomy provided audio recordings of 5 sentences from the Sentence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
The Effect of Noise on Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Self-Reported Communication Measures in Tracheoesophageal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanya L. Eadie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Devon Sawin Otero
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Susan Bolt
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Mara Kapsner-Smith
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Jessica R. Sullivan
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Tanya L. Eadie: teadie@u.washington.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar
    Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
The Effect of Noise on Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Self-Reported Communication Measures in Tracheoesophageal Speakers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 393-407. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0081
History: Received June 17, 2015 , Revised October 29, 2015 , Accepted December 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 393-407. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0081
History: Received June 17, 2015; Revised October 29, 2015; Accepted December 22, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how sentence intelligibility relates to self-reported communication in tracheoesophageal speakers when speech intelligibility is measured in quiet and noise.

Method Twenty-four tracheoesophageal speakers who were at least 1 year postlaryngectomy provided audio recordings of 5 sentences from the Sentence Intelligibility Test. Speakers also completed self-reported measures of communication—the Voice Handicap Index-10 and the Communicative Participation Item Bank short form. Speech recordings were presented to 2 groups of inexperienced listeners who heard sentences in quiet or noise. Listeners transcribed the sentences to yield speech intelligibility scores.

Results Very weak relationships were found between intelligibility in quiet and measures of voice handicap and communicative participation. Slightly stronger, but still weak and nonsignificant, relationships were observed between measures of intelligibility in noise and both self-reported measures. However, 12 speakers who were more than 65% intelligible in noise showed strong and statistically significant relationships with both self-reported measures (R 2 = .76–.79).

Conclusions Speech intelligibility in quiet is a weak predictor of self-reported communication measures in tracheoesophageal speakers. Speech intelligibility in noise may be a better metric of self-reported communicative function for speakers who demonstrate higher speech intelligibility in noise.

Acknowledgments
This work is based on a thesis by the second author, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science degree in medical speech-language pathology from the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington. We would like to thank Kristie Spencer and Kathryn Yorkston for their valuable insight and feedback. We also would like to thank many members of the International Association of Laryngectomees for their participation in this study. Portions of this research were supported by National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA177635, awarded to the first author.
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