Augmenting College Students' Study of Speech-Language Pathology Using Computer-Based Mini Quiz Games Purpose This study examined whether undergraduate college students' immediate recall and longer-term retention of introductory voice disorder concepts improved by using mini quiz games (MQGs; interactive knowledge tests in game format) compared with (a) traditional study alone, (b) MQGs and traditional study together, or (c) a no-study control condition. ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2016
Augmenting College Students' Study of Speech-Language Pathology Using Computer-Based Mini Quiz Games
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa A. Vinney
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Les Howles
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Glen Leverson
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Nadine P. Connor
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Disclosure : The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure : The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lisa A. Vinney: lavinne@ilstu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Katherine Verdolini Abbott
    Associate Editor: Katherine Verdolini Abbott×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 2016
Augmenting College Students' Study of Speech-Language Pathology Using Computer-Based Mini Quiz Games
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 416-425. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0125
History: Received August 28, 2014 , Revised January 25, 2015 , Accepted January 25, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2016, Vol. 25, 416-425. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0125
History: Received August 28, 2014; Revised January 25, 2015; Accepted January 25, 2015

Purpose This study examined whether undergraduate college students' immediate recall and longer-term retention of introductory voice disorder concepts improved by using mini quiz games (MQGs; interactive knowledge tests in game format) compared with (a) traditional study alone, (b) MQGs and traditional study together, or (c) a no-study control condition.

Method Ninety-three college students participated in proctored sessions in which they were given a pretest, viewed an online lecture on introductory voice disorder concepts, and then engaged in either no intervention or interventions including traditional study, MQG play, or both MQG play and traditional study, followed by an immediate recall posttest and longer-term retention follow-up test.

Results Analyses suggested that the effects of all interventions (traditional study, MQG play, and the combination of the 2) were equivalent and resulted in significantly greater improvements from pretest to immediate recall posttest performance than the control condition. In contrast, MQGs and MQGs with traditional study, but not traditional study alone, showed better results for long-term retention than no study.

Conclusion Results provide preliminary support for the idea that there may be multiple effective learning modes, beyond traditional study, that enhance recall and retention of knowledge foundational to speech-language pathology clinical training and practice.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge the Engage to Learn Simulations and Games Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for funding and support of this project as well as Dr. Lori Bakken for consultation on this study's research design. The mini quiz games can be found at: http://csd.wisc.edu/slpgames/
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