Exploring a Phonological Process Approach to Adult Pronunciation Training Purpose The production of speech sound classes in adult language learners is affected by (a) interference between the native language and the target language and (b) speaker variables such as time speaking English. In this article, we demonstrate how phonological process analysis, an approach typically used in child speech, can ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2016
Exploring a Phonological Process Approach to Adult Pronunciation Training
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amber Franklin
    Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Lana McDaniel
    C.A. Beard Memorial School Corporation, Greenfield, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Amber Franklin: franklad@miamiOh.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Carole Ferrand
    Associate Editor: Carole Ferrand×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2016
Exploring a Phonological Process Approach to Adult Pronunciation Training
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 172-182. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0172
History: Received September 25, 2014 , Revised May 6, 2015 , Accepted October 23, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 172-182. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0172
History: Received September 25, 2014; Revised May 6, 2015; Accepted October 23, 2015

Purpose The production of speech sound classes in adult language learners is affected by (a) interference between the native language and the target language and (b) speaker variables such as time speaking English. In this article, we demonstrate how phonological process analysis, an approach typically used in child speech, can be used to characterize adult target language phonological learning.

Method Sentences produced by 2 adult Japanese English language learners were transcribed and coded for phoneme accuracy and analyzed according to the percent occurrence of phonological processes. The results were interpreted relative to a contrastive analysis between Japanese and English phonetic inventories and developmental norms for monolingual English children.

Results In this pilot study, common consonant processes included vocalization, final consonant devoicing, and cluster reduction. These are processes commonly observed in the speech of children who are typically developing.

Conclusions The process analysis can inform clinical approaches to pronunciation training in adult English language learners. For example, the cycles approach (Hodson & Paden, 1981) may provide more clinical efficacy than an articulatory approach in which phonemes are targeted individually. In addition, a process analysis can enable clinicians to examine the principles of within-class and across-class generalization in adult pronunciation instruction.

Acknowledgments
The preparation of this article was supported in part by a predoctoral fellowship (F31 HD046412-05) from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, awarded to Amber D. Franklin. The authors thank the members of the English Language Learning and Pronunciation Lab at Miami University, Ann Dillard, Lisa Floccari, Lauren Polster, Kaitlyn Gilftert, and Anna Lichtenstein, and Barbara Weinrich, Jeanie Ducher, and Dana Miller for their assistance with manuscript preparation.
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