Clinical and Quality of Life Outcomes of Speech Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Delivered to the Home Via Telerehabilitation: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial Purpose This study investigated the noninferiority and validity of an intensive speech treatment for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) delivered via telerehabilitation to the home. The effect of location on online delivery was also investigated. Method In this single-blinded, randomized controlled noninferiority trial, 31 participants with dysarthria associated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2016
Clinical and Quality of Life Outcomes of Speech Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Delivered to the Home Via Telerehabilitation: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah G. Theodoros
    The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Anne J. Hill
    The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Trevor G. Russell
    The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors disclose their material interest in eHAB through NeoRehab, UniQuest, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Disclosure: The authors disclose their material interest in eHAB through NeoRehab, UniQuest, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. ×
  • Correspondence to Deborah G. Theodoros: d.theodoros@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Ryalls
    Associate Editor: Jack Ryalls×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2016
Clinical and Quality of Life Outcomes of Speech Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Delivered to the Home Via Telerehabilitation: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 214-232. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0005
History: Received January 20, 2015 , Revised July 7, 2015 , Accepted November 30, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 214-232. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0005
History: Received January 20, 2015; Revised July 7, 2015; Accepted November 30, 2015

Purpose This study investigated the noninferiority and validity of an intensive speech treatment for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) delivered via telerehabilitation to the home. The effect of location on online delivery was also investigated.

Method In this single-blinded, randomized controlled noninferiority trial, 31 participants with dysarthria associated with PD from a metropolitan area were randomly assigned to either face-to-face or online Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD). A cohort of 21 participants from nonmetropolitan areas was also recruited and treated online. Outcomes were assessed using acoustic, perceptual, and quality of life measures.

Results Noninferiority of online treatment was confirmed through comparable clinical and quality of life outcomes for the metropolitan online and face-to-face treatment groups. Significant improvements posttreatment were achieved for several acoustic, perceptual, and quality of life measures across the groups. No significant effect of online treatment location was identified.

Conclusions Clinical and quality of life outcomes supported the noninferiority and validity of online delivery of intensive speech treatment to people with PD in the home. Future research should address the implementation of online treatment in a clinical service, cost analyses, and potentially technology-enabled clinical pathways for people with PD in order to maintain optimal communication and quality of life.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant 631514. We express our sincere thanks to the people with Parkinson's disease and their families who participated in this study. We acknowledge the research assistance contributions of Monique Waite, Anna Rumbach, Stacie Park, Rachelle Pitt, and Sarah Skerrett.
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