Use of Crowdsourcing to Assess the Ecological Validity of Perceptual-Training Paradigms in Dysarthria Purpose It has been documented in laboratory settings that familiarizing listeners with dysarthric speech improves intelligibility of that speech. If these findings can be replicated in real-world settings, the ability to improve communicative function by focusing on communication partners has major implications for extending clinical practice in dysarthria rehabilitation. An ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 01, 2016
Use of Crowdsourcing to Assess the Ecological Validity of Perceptual-Training Paradigms in Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kaitlin L. Lansford
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Stephanie A. Borrie
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Lukas Bystricky
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kaitlin Lansford: klansford@fsu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Note
Research Note   |   May 01, 2016
Use of Crowdsourcing to Assess the Ecological Validity of Perceptual-Training Paradigms in Dysarthria
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 233-239. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0059
History: Received May 26, 2015 , Revised August 31, 2015 , Accepted November 30, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 233-239. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0059
History: Received May 26, 2015; Revised August 31, 2015; Accepted November 30, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose It has been documented in laboratory settings that familiarizing listeners with dysarthric speech improves intelligibility of that speech. If these findings can be replicated in real-world settings, the ability to improve communicative function by focusing on communication partners has major implications for extending clinical practice in dysarthria rehabilitation. An important step toward development of a listener-targeted treatment approach requires establishment of its ecological validity. To this end, the present study leveraged the mechanism of crowdsourcing to determine whether perceptual-training benefits achieved by listeners in the laboratory could be elicited in an at-home computer-based scenario.

Method Perceptual-training data (i.e., intelligibility scores from a posttraining transcription task) were collected from listeners in 2 settings—the laboratory and the crowdsourcing website Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Results Consistent with previous findings, results revealed a main effect of training condition (training vs. control) on intelligibility scores. There was, however, no effect of training setting (Mechanical Turk vs. laboratory). Thus, the perceptual benefit achieved via Mechanical Turk was comparable to that achieved in the laboratory.

Conclusion This study provides evidence regarding the ecological validity of perceptual-training paradigms designed to improve intelligibility of dysarthric speech, thereby supporting their continued advancement as a listener-targeted treatment option.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation 2014 New Century Scholars grant, awarded to Kaitlin L. Lansford. We gratefully acknowledge Tara McAllister Byun and Daniel Szeredi for sharing their Experigen code, which facilitated the development of the online experiment. As a final matter, we extend our gratitude to Julie Liss for the continued use of her extensive dysarthria speech-sample database.
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