Knowing What We're Doing: Why Specification of Treatment Methods Is Critical for Evidence-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus article is to describe the conceptual framework of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment taxonomy (RTT) and illustrate its potential use in speech-language pathology (SLP) clinical practice and research. Method The method used was a critical discussion. Results Current methods of ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2016
Knowing What We're Doing: Why Specification of Treatment Methods Is Critical for Evidence-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lyn S. Turkstra
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Rocío Norman
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • John Whyte
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Elkins Park, PA
  • Marcel P. Dijkers
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
  • Tessa Hart
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Elkins Park, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lyn S. Turkstra: lyn.turkstra@wisc.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2016
Knowing What We're Doing: Why Specification of Treatment Methods Is Critical for Evidence-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 164-171. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0060
History: Received May 26, 2015 , Revised October 31, 2015 , Accepted December 8, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 164-171. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0060
History: Received May 26, 2015; Revised October 31, 2015; Accepted December 8, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus article is to describe the conceptual framework of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment taxonomy (RTT) and illustrate its potential use in speech-language pathology (SLP) clinical practice and research.

Method The method used was a critical discussion.

Results Current methods of defining and classifying SLP and other rehabilitation interventions maintain the “black box” of rehabilitation by referring to hours or days of therapy or using problem-oriented labels (e.g., naming treatment) to describe treatments, none of which reveal what is actually done to effect desired changes in patient functioning. The RTT framework uses treatment targets, ingredients, and mechanisms of action defined by treatment theory to specify SLP and other rehabilitation interventions with greater precision than current methods of treatment labeling and classification. It also makes a distinction between the target of treatment at which ingredients are directed and broader aims of treatment, which may be downstream effects explained instead by enablement/disablement theory.

Conclusion Future application of the RTT conceptual scheme to SLP intervention may enhance clinical practice, research, and knowledge translation as well as training and program evaluation efforts.

Acknowledgments
This work was partially supported through a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Award (ME-1403-14083) and National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (now National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research) Cooperative Agreement H133A080053 and a Diversity Supplement to Grant R01 HD071089 from the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, to Rocío Norman. All statements in this report, including its findings and conclusions, are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute or its Board of Governors or Methodology Committee.
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