Management of Persistent Cognitive Symptoms After Sport-Related Concussion Purpose This case review examines treatments speech-language pathologists at our clinic delivered to middle school, high school, and college students for the management of persistent cognitive symptoms after sport-related concussion. The goal is to examine a range of treatment options, describe clinical rationale for selecting those treatments, and report outcomes ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   May 01, 2016
Management of Persistent Cognitive Symptoms After Sport-Related Concussion
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • McKay Moore Sohlberg
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Alexander K. Ledbetter
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Alexander K. Ledbetter: ledbette@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Associate Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Clinical Forum: Record Reviews
Clinical Forum   |   May 01, 2016
Management of Persistent Cognitive Symptoms After Sport-Related Concussion
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 138-149. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0128
History: Received August 30, 2014 , Revised March 5, 2015 , Accepted June 17, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2016, Vol. 25, 138-149. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0128
History: Received August 30, 2014; Revised March 5, 2015; Accepted June 17, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose This case review examines treatments speech-language pathologists at our clinic delivered to middle school, high school, and college students for the management of persistent cognitive symptoms after sport-related concussion. The goal is to examine a range of treatment options, describe clinical rationale for selecting those treatments, and report outcomes in order to identify feasible interventions for systematic evaluation through efficacy research.

Method Review of clinic intake data identified 63 cases referred for cognitive rehabilitation over a 36-month period. Twenty-four cases (14 women and 10 men) met selection criteria, including documented sport-related concussion, postconcussion symptoms persisting at least 2 months with deleterious effect on school performance, and enrollment in secondary or postsecondary education. The authors independently coded demographics, treatment approaches, functional goal domains, and outcomes.

Results Treatment approaches fell into 4 broad categories: direct attention training, metacognitive strategy training, training assistive technology for cognition, and psychoeducational supports. Eighty-three percent of clients achieved self-selected functional goals.

Conclusions Research has focused primarily on return to play and provision of academic accommodations in the initial weeks following concussion. Findings from this case series suggest that speech-language pathologists can deliver individualized interventions that lead to positive clinical outcomes. The authors hope findings encourage efficacy research.

Acknowledgment
We wish to acknowledge the clients who engaged in their therapies and worked to address their symptoms and the clinicians who partnered with them in these efforts.
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