Be Clear: A New Intensive Speech Treatment for Adults With Nonprogressive Dysarthria Purpose This article describes the effects of a new intensive dysarthria treatment program (Be Clear) on speech intelligibility in adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke and traumatic brain injury. Method A small group–repeated measures research design was used to examine the effects of treatment on the speech of ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2016
Be Clear: A New Intensive Speech Treatment for Adults With Nonprogressive Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacie Park
    The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
  • Deborah Theodoros
    The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
  • Emma Finch
    The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
    Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
    Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Elizabeth Cardell
    Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Elizabeth Cardell is now with Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Elizabeth Cardell is now with Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.×
  • Correspondence to Stacie Park: s.park3@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Ryalls
    Associate Editor: Jack Ryalls×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 2016
Be Clear: A New Intensive Speech Treatment for Adults With Nonprogressive Dysarthria
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2016, Vol. 25, 97-110. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0113
History: Received August 7, 2014 , Revised January 29, 2015 , Accepted July 21, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2016, Vol. 25, 97-110. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0113
History: Received August 7, 2014; Revised January 29, 2015; Accepted July 21, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This article describes the effects of a new intensive dysarthria treatment program (Be Clear) on speech intelligibility in adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke and traumatic brain injury.

Method A small group–repeated measures research design was used to examine the effects of treatment on the speech of 8 participants with nonprogressive dysarthria. Treatment consisted of a 1-hr prepractice session followed by 1-hr therapy sessions, 4 times per week, for 4 weeks (16 sessions). Paired-comparison ratings of speech intelligibility served as the primary outcome measure for the study. Perceptual data, quality of life, and communication partner opinion were obtained at 3 time intervals: (a) prior to treatment, (b) immediately posttreatment, and (c) 1–3 months posttreatment.

Results Following treatment, group data demonstrated substantial improvements in speech intelligibility as perceived by naive listeners on a paired-comparison rating task. Word intelligibility was clinically significantly improved posttreatment and sentence intelligibility demonstrated statistically significant improvement. Communication partner ratings of speech intelligibility and overall communicative function were statistically significantly improved posttreatment.

Conclusions The results of this study suggest that this new intensive treatment may have potential as an effective intervention for nonprogressive dysarthria. However, controlled studies are required to establish treatment efficacy.

Acknowledgment
The authors would like to thank the speech pathology department of the Princess Alexandra Hospital and The Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service for their support with participant recruitment.
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