Evaluation of Speech Amplification Devices in Parkinson's Disease Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selected speech amplification devices in individuals with hypophonia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Method This study compared the effectiveness of seven devices (ADDvox, BoomVox, ChatterVox, Oticon Amigo, SoniVox, Spokeman, and Voicette) to unamplified speech for 11 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2016
Evaluation of Speech Amplification Devices in Parkinson's Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monika D. Andreetta
    Western University, London, ON, Canada
  • Scott G. Adams
    Western University, London, ON, Canada
  • Allyson D. Dykstra
    Western University, London, ON, Canada
  • Mandar Jog
    Western University, London, ON, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Monika D. Andreetta: mschel@uwo.ca
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Dawna Lewis
    Associate Editor: Dawna Lewis×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2016
Evaluation of Speech Amplification Devices in Parkinson's Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2016, Vol. 25, 29-45. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0008
History: Received January 23, 2015 , Revised June 11, 2015 , Accepted July 31, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2016, Vol. 25, 29-45. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-15-0008
History: Received January 23, 2015; Revised June 11, 2015; Accepted July 31, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selected speech amplification devices in individuals with hypophonia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD).

Method This study compared the effectiveness of seven devices (ADDvox, BoomVox, ChatterVox, Oticon Amigo, SoniVox, Spokeman, and Voicette) to unamplified speech for 11 participants with PD during conversation in 65-dB SPL multitalker noise, using experience ratings collected from participant questionnaires and speech performance measures (i.e., speech-to-noise ratio [SNR], speech intensity, and intelligibility) obtained from audio recordings.

Results Compared with unamplified speech, device use increased SNR by 1.07–4.73 dB SPL and speech intensity by 1.1–5.1 dB SPL, and it significantly increased transcribed intelligibility from 13.8% to 58.9%. In addition, the type of device used significantly affected speech performance measures (e.g., BoomVox was significantly higher than most of the other devices for SNR, speech intensity, and intelligibility). However, experience ratings did not always correspond to performance measures.

Conclusions This study found preliminary evidence of improved speech performance with device use for individuals with PD. A tentative hierarchy is suggested for device recommendations. Future research is needed to determine which measures will predict long-term device acceptance in PD.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, awarded to Monika D. Andreetta.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access