Masked Repetition Priming in Treatment of Anomia: A Phase 2 Study Purpose Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to masked primes may improve naming accuracy for individuals with anomia. This study investigates the effect of repeated exposures to masked identity primes paired with pictures over multiple trials, sessions, and days on the ability of people with anomia to name those pictures. ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 2015
Masked Repetition Priming in Treatment of Anomia: A Phase 2 Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • JoAnn P. Silkes
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to JoAnn P. Silkes: jsilkes@uw.edu
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Heather Wright
    Associate Editor: Heather Wright×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 44th Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 2015
Masked Repetition Priming in Treatment of Anomia: A Phase 2 Study
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S895-S912. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0138
History: Received September 12, 2014 , Revised February 10, 2015 , Accepted May 11, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S895-S912. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0138
History: Received September 12, 2014; Revised February 10, 2015; Accepted May 11, 2015

Purpose Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to masked primes may improve naming accuracy for individuals with anomia. This study investigates the effect of repeated exposures to masked identity primes paired with pictures over multiple trials, sessions, and days on the ability of people with anomia to name those pictures.

Method Four participants with anomia completed this single-subject, multiple-baseline design study. Twelve treatment sessions were conducted for each of 2 semantic categories. Comparisons of performance on naming probes were made between items that were primed, unprimed but seen the same number of times, and unprimed and seen only during naming probes.

Results All participants showed some gains in naming trained items although to varying degrees, and trained (primed) items generally showed greater improvement than untrained items seen the same number of times. Cross-category generalization was observed for some participants, but little to no within-category generalization occurred. Minimal changes occurred on measures of general language ability.

Conclusions These data provide continued evidence that masked repetition priming can have a positive effect on naming for people with anomia. Factors that may influence participant response and additional questions that must be settled for this line of research to continue are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5 R03 DC012643-02 (awarded to JoAnn P. Silkes). Thanks to Sara Pack, Amanda Hendricks, and Julie Cooke for assistance with stimulus development and data processing and the University of Washington Aphasia Research Lab for ongoing support.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access