Perspectives of Clinicians Involved in the RESTART-Study: Outcomes of a Focus Group Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and beliefs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with regard to the Lidcombe Program and Demands and Capacities–based treatment and to examine how these attitudes and beliefs might have changed as a result of participating in the RESTART-study. Method ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2015
Perspectives of Clinicians Involved in the RESTART-Study: Outcomes of a Focus Group
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Caroline de Sonneville-Koedoot
    Institute of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
    Erasmus University Medical Center, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Samantha A. Adams
    Institute of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
    The Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society, Tilburg University, the Netherlands
  • Elly A. Stolk
    Institute of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Marie-Christine Franken
    Erasmus University Medical Center, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Caroline de Sonneville-Koedoot: desonneville@bmg.eur.nl
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Hall
    Associate Editor: Nancy Hall×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2015
Perspectives of Clinicians Involved in the RESTART-Study: Outcomes of a Focus Group
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, 708-716. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0215
History: Received December 22, 2014 , Revised May 19, 2015 , Accepted August 2, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, 708-716. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0215
History: Received December 22, 2014; Revised May 19, 2015; Accepted August 2, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and beliefs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with regard to the Lidcombe Program and Demands and Capacities–based treatment and to examine how these attitudes and beliefs might have changed as a result of participating in the RESTART-study.

Method A focus group meeting with 13 SLPs was organized. The discussion was structured using questions on therapy preference, attitudes about and explicit comparison of both treatments and treatment manuals, and learnings of trial participation.

Results Four main themes were identified. First, a change in attitude toward treatment choice was observed. Second, this change was related to a change in beliefs about the potential of both treatments. Third, aspects of the treatments regarded as success factors were considered. Last, learning outcomes and increased professionalism as a result of participating in the RESTART-trial were discussed.

Conclusions This study showed how attitudes and beliefs of SLPs with regard to the Lidcombe Program and Demands and Capacities–based treatment evolved during a randomized trial. This work increases our understanding of the role of attitudes and beliefs in the uptake and utilization of therapies and demonstrates the importance of collecting qualitative data. Results and recommendations should prove of value in implementing the RESTART-trial results and in training SLPs.

Acknowledgments
Support for this project was provided by The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) and The Damsté-Terpstra Fonds voor praktische en preventieve logopedie. We are very grateful to the speech-language pathologists who participated in the focus group meeting (and whose input was used anonymously) for their time and valuable input. We thank Jenny de Sonneville-Maybin for her valuable comments on this article.
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