Impact of Personal Relevance on Acquisition and Generalization of Script Training for Aphasia: A Preliminary Analysis Purpose The importance of personalization in script training in aphasia has been assumed but never tested. This study compared acquisition and generalization of personally relevant versus generic words or phrases appearing in the same scripts. Method Eight individuals (6 men; 2 women) with chronic aphasia received 3 weeks ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 2015
Impact of Personal Relevance on Acquisition and Generalization of Script Training for Aphasia: A Preliminary Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leora R. Cherney
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, Chicago, IL
    Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
  • Rosalind C. Kaye
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, Chicago, IL
  • Jaime B. Lee
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, Chicago, IL
  • Sarel van Vuuren
    Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado-Boulder
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Leora R. Cherney: lcherney@ric.org
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Gina Youmans
    Associate Editor: Gina Youmans×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement: Select Papers From the 44th Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 2015
Impact of Personal Relevance on Acquisition and Generalization of Script Training for Aphasia: A Preliminary Analysis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S913-S922. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0162
History: Received September 16, 2014 , Revised February 13, 2015 , Accepted May 13, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S913-S922. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0162
History: Received September 16, 2014; Revised February 13, 2015; Accepted May 13, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The importance of personalization in script training in aphasia has been assumed but never tested. This study compared acquisition and generalization of personally relevant versus generic words or phrases appearing in the same scripts.

Method Eight individuals (6 men; 2 women) with chronic aphasia received 3 weeks of intensive computer-based script training. For each participant, 2 scripts, a trained and an untrained generalization script, were embedded with 4 personally relevant word choices and 2–4 generic items that were similar across participants. Scripts were probed for accuracy at baseline and posttreatment. Significance testing was conducted on baseline and posttreatment scores, and for gains in personally relevant versus generic items. Effect sizes were computed.

Results Both personally relevant and generic items improved significantly on trained scripts. Improvements on untrained scripts were smaller, with only personally relevant items reaching significance. There was no significant difference on gains made on personalized versus generic items for trained scripts (p = .059), but the effect size was large (d = 0.90). For generalization scripts, this effect was small (d = 0.25) and nonsignificant.

Conclusions Personally relevant words and phrases were acquired, although not generalized, more successfully than generic words and phrases. Data supports the importance of personalization in script training, but the degree of that importance requires further investigation.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Award No. 1R01 DC011754 (to LRC and SvV). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding organizations. Endorsement by the Federal Government should not be assumed. AphasiaScripts® is registered to the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL. None of the authors have a financial interest in the software product. The authors extend their thanks to Julia Carpenter, Rachel Hitch, and Rosalind Hurwitz who collected and scored data; to Anita Halper and Audrey Holland who served as consultants on the grant; and to Nattawut Ngampatipatpong who modified the AphasiaScripts software for the purposes of this study.
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