Examining the Echolalia Literature: Where Do Speech-Language Pathologists Stand? Purpose Echolalia is a common element in the communication of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Recent contributions to the literature reflect significant disagreement regarding how echolalia should be defined, understood, and managed. The purpose of this review article is to give speech-language pathologists and others a comprehensive view of the ... Review Article
Review Article  |   November 01, 2015
Examining the Echolalia Literature: Where Do Speech-Language Pathologists Stand?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lillian N. Stiegler
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lillian N. Stiegler: lstiegler@selu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress
    Associate Editor: Cynthia Cress×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Review Articles
Review Article   |   November 01, 2015
Examining the Echolalia Literature: Where Do Speech-Language Pathologists Stand?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, 750-762. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0166
History: Received September 21, 2014 , Revised February 8, 2015 , Accepted June 3, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, 750-762. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0166
History: Received September 21, 2014; Revised February 8, 2015; Accepted June 3, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Echolalia is a common element in the communication of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Recent contributions to the literature reflect significant disagreement regarding how echolalia should be defined, understood, and managed. The purpose of this review article is to give speech-language pathologists and others a comprehensive view of the available perspectives on echolalia.

Method Published literature from the disciplines of behavioral intervention, linguistics, and speech-language intervention is discussed. Special areas of focus include operational definitions, rationales associated with various approaches, specific procedures used to treat or study echolalic behavior, and reported conclusions.

Conclusions Dissimilarities in the definition and understanding of echolalia have led to vastly different approaches to management. Evidence-based practice protocols are available to guide speech-language interventionists in their work with individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

Acknowledgement
The author acknowledges Marge Blanc and Patrick Rydell for their kind and patient contributions to sections of this review article.
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