Stability of Word-Retrieval Errors With the AphasiaBank Stimuli Purpose This study examined the test–retest reliability of select measures of word-retrieval errors in narrative discourses of individuals with aphasia assessed with the AphasiaBank stimuli. Method Ten participants with aphasia were video recorded during 2 sessions producing narratives elicited with pictures. Discourses were transcribed and coded using AphasiaBank ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 2015
Stability of Word-Retrieval Errors With the AphasiaBank Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Boyle
    Montclair State University, Bloomfield, NJ
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mary Boyle: boylem@mail.montclair.edu
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: William Hula
    Associate Editor: William Hula×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement: Select Papers From the 44th Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 2015
Stability of Word-Retrieval Errors With the AphasiaBank Stimuli
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S953-S960. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0152
History: Received September 15, 2014 , Revised February 7, 2015 , Accepted June 2, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S953-S960. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0152
History: Received September 15, 2014; Revised February 7, 2015; Accepted June 2, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study examined the test–retest reliability of select measures of word-retrieval errors in narrative discourses of individuals with aphasia assessed with the AphasiaBank stimuli.

Method Ten participants with aphasia were video recorded during 2 sessions producing narratives elicited with pictures. Discourses were transcribed and coded using AphasiaBank procedures, then analyzed for the stability of rates of phonological errors, semantic errors, false starts, time fillers, and repetitions per minute. Values for correlation coefficients and the minimal detectable change score were used to assess stability for research and clinical decision making.

Results There was poor test–retest reliability when the discourses were analyzed by each narrative subgenre. When the narrative discourses were combined for analysis, several measures appeared to be sufficiently stable across sessions for use in group studies, and 1 could be adequately stable for making clinical decisions about an individual.

Conclusions Because the short speech samples yielded by the subgenre narrative analyses demonstrated poor test–retest reliability, it is recommended that all of the picture-based narrative discourse tasks be combined for analysis of word-retrieval impairments when the AphasiaBank stimuli are used. However, the confidence intervals associated with the reliability coefficients obtained in this study suggest caution in using the measures if they are based on performance in a single session. More investigations of the test–retest reliability of measures used to study language impairment in discourse contexts are essential.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a Separately Budgeted Research Award from Montclair State University. Sincere gratitude and appreciation are extended to the people with aphasia who participated and to the students who assisted in various stages of this project—namely, Keli Meyer, Ashley Leeshock, Elizabeth Kline, Julie Irwin, Kortney Babington, Melissa Burnham, and Jasmine Wallace.
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