Structure, Processes, and Retrospective Outcomes From an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program Purpose This study describes the structure, processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP). The aim was to identify treatment gains and determine if outcomes were significantly different between participants grouped according to severity and type of aphasia, and time postonset. Method Data from 74 first-time ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 2015
Structure, Processes, and Retrospective Outcomes From an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edna M. Babbitt
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Aphasia Research & Treatment, IL
    Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL
    The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences–St. Lucia, Australia
  • Linda Worrall
    The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences–St. Lucia, Australia
    NHMRC CCRE in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Queensland, Australia
  • Leora R. Cherney
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Aphasia Research & Treatment, IL
    Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Leora R. Cherney: lcherney@ric.org
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Janet Patterson
    Associate Editor: Janet Patterson×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 44th Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 2015
Structure, Processes, and Retrospective Outcomes From an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S854-S863. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0164
History: Received September 16, 2014 , Revised February 16, 2015 , Accepted May 4, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S854-S863. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0164
History: Received September 16, 2014; Revised February 16, 2015; Accepted May 4, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose This study describes the structure, processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP). The aim was to identify treatment gains and determine if outcomes were significantly different between participants grouped according to severity and type of aphasia, and time postonset.

Method Data from 74 first-time ICAP participants were analyzed. Pre- and posttreatment scores on the Western Aphasia Battery–Revised and other impairment and participation measures were compared using paired t tests. Analyses of variance were used to compare outcomes related to aphasia severity (severe, moderate, and mild aphasia), aphasia type (fluent, nonfluent), and chronicity (0–6 months postonset, 7–12 months postonset, and 12+ months postonset).

Results Participants made significant changes on all impairment and participation measures. Large effect sizes were noted for one participation and three impairment measures. Medium effect sizes were noted for one impairment and three participation measures. There was no significant difference among groups on any factor.

Conclusion ICAPs can have a significant effect on the language impairment and participation of people with aphasia, but further research is required to determine if the effect is comparable to other types of service delivery.

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