Negative Word Production in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Effects of Implicit Assessment and Contextual Bias Purpose Both theory and evidence suggest that unilateral right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) should impair the processing of negative emotions. Typical metalinguistic assessments, however, may obscure processing strengths. This study investigated whether adults with RHD would produce proportionately fewer negative emotion words than control participants in an implicit assessment task ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 2015
Negative Word Production in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Effects of Implicit Assessment and Contextual Bias
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexandra Zezinka
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Connie A. Tompkins
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Alexandra Zezinka: zezinka.1@osu.edu, who is now at The Ohio State University.
  • Editor: Anastasia Raymer
    Editor: Anastasia Raymer×
  • Associate Editor: Laura Murray
    Associate Editor: Laura Murray×
Article Information
Special Populations / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Select Papers From the 44th Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 2015
Negative Word Production in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Effects of Implicit Assessment and Contextual Bias
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S815-S827. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0136
History: Received September 11, 2014 , Revised January 30, 2015 , Accepted April 5, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, S815-S827. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0136
History: Received September 11, 2014; Revised January 30, 2015; Accepted April 5, 2015

Purpose Both theory and evidence suggest that unilateral right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) should impair the processing of negative emotions. Typical metalinguistic assessments, however, may obscure processing strengths. This study investigated whether adults with RHD would produce proportionately fewer negative emotion words than control participants in an implicit assessment task and whether a negatively toned contextual bias would enhance performance.

Methods Eleven participants with RHD and 10 control participants without brain damage watched a video in 2 parts and described each segment. Between segments, participants evaluated the emotion conveyed by sentences designed to induce the negative bias.

Results The primary outcome measure, percentage of negative emotion words in video descriptions, did not differ between groups. After the contextual bias, this measure significantly increased for both groups, whereas production of motion words, a control variable, remained constant.

Conclusions Findings are consistent with a view that attributes some deficient RHD performances to the nature and/or demands of explicit metalinguistic assessment tasks. These results call for modulation of prevailing hypotheses that attribute negative emotion processing as an undifferentiated whole solely to the right cerebral hemisphere. The results also further substantiate the rationale of an experimental treatment that exploits contextual bias and priming for individuals with RHD.

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