Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: A Systematic Review of Intervention Research Between 2004 and 2012 Objectives The aim was for the appointed committee of the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences to conduct a systematic review of published intervention studies of acquired apraxia of speech (AOS), updating the previous committee's review article from 2006. Method A systematic search of 11 databases identified ... Review Article
Review Article  |   May 01, 2015
Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: A Systematic Review of Intervention Research Between 2004 and 2012
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kirrie J. Ballard
    The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    Veterans Affairs, Salt Lake City Healthcare System and The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Claire Layfield
    The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia
  • Edwin Maas
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Shannon Mauszycki
    Veterans Affairs, Salt Lake City Healthcare System and The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    University of Pittsburgh and Veterans Administration, Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kirrie J. Ballard: kirrie.ballard@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Review Articles
Review Article   |   May 01, 2015
Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: A Systematic Review of Intervention Research Between 2004 and 2012
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 316-337. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0118
History: Received August 21, 2014 , Revised January 20, 2015 , Accepted February 16, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 316-337. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0118
History: Received August 21, 2014; Revised January 20, 2015; Accepted February 16, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Objectives The aim was for the appointed committee of the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences to conduct a systematic review of published intervention studies of acquired apraxia of speech (AOS), updating the previous committee's review article from 2006.

Method A systematic search of 11 databases identified 215 articles, with 26 meeting inclusion criteria of (a) stating intention to measure effects of treatment on AOS and (b) data representing treatment effects for at least 1 individual stated to have AOS.

Results All studies involved within-participant experimental designs, with sample sizes of 1 to 44 (median = 1). Confidence in diagnosis was rated high to reasonable in 18 of 26 studies. Most studies (24/26) reported on articulatory–kinematic approaches; 2 applied rhythm/rate control methods. Six studies had sufficient experimental control for Class III rating according to the Clinical Practice Guidelines Process Manual (American Academy of Neurology, 2011), with 15 others satisfying all criteria for Class III except use of independent or objective outcome measurement.

Conclusions The most important global clinical conclusion from this review is that the weight of evidence supports a strong effect for both articulatory–kinematic and rate/rhythm approaches to AOS treatment. The quantity of work, experimental rigor, and reporting of diagnostic criteria continue to improve and strengthen confidence in the corpus of research.

Acknowledgments
Sources of support for this review included the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 2, Australian Research Council Future Fellowship FT120100355, and National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant 632763 awarded to Kirrie J. Ballard and Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development support provided to Julie L. Wambaugh, Malcolm R. McNeil, and Shannon Mauszycki. We thank the University of Sydney for librarian support in conducting initial searches (JohnPaul Cenzato) and four students for completing SCED and PEDro-P ratings.
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