An Exploratory Study of Reading Comprehension in College Students After Acquired Brain Injury Purpose This exploratory study builds on the small body of existing research investigating reading comprehension deficits in college students with acquired brain injury (ABI). Method Twenty-four community college students with ABI completed a battery of questionnaires and standardized tests to characterize self-perceptions of academic reading ability, performance on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2015
An Exploratory Study of Reading Comprehension in College Students After Acquired Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • McKay Moore Sohlberg
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Gina G. Griffiths
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Stephen Fickas
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to McKay Moore Sohlberg: mckay@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Diane Kendall
    Associate Editor: Diane Kendall×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2015
An Exploratory Study of Reading Comprehension in College Students After Acquired Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2015, Vol. 24, 358-373. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0033
History: Received March 11, 2014 , Revised October 14, 2014 , Accepted February 23, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2015, Vol. 24, 358-373. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0033
History: Received March 11, 2014; Revised October 14, 2014; Accepted February 23, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This exploratory study builds on the small body of existing research investigating reading comprehension deficits in college students with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Method Twenty-four community college students with ABI completed a battery of questionnaires and standardized tests to characterize self-perceptions of academic reading ability, performance on a standardized reading comprehension measure, and a variety of cognitive functions of this population. Half of the participants in the sample reported traumatic brain injury (n = 12) and half reported nontraumatic ABI (n = 12).

Results College students with both traumatic and nontraumatic ABI cite problems with reading comprehension and academic performance postinjury. Mean performance on a standardized reading measure, the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (Brown, Fischo, & Hanna, 1993), was low to below average and was significantly correlated with performance on the Speed and Capacity of Language Processing Test (Baddeley, Emslie, & Nimmo-Smith, 1992). Injury status of traumatic versus nontraumatic ABI did not differentiate results. Regression analysis showed that measures of verbal attention and suppression obtained from the California Verbal Language Test–II (Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000) predicted total scores on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test.

Conclusions College students with ABI are vulnerable to reading comprehension problems. Results align with other research suggesting that verbal attention and suppression problems may be contributing factors.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Grant 208710 from the National Science Foundation.
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