A Taxonomy of Voice Therapy Purpose Voice therapy practice and research, as in most types of rehabilitation, is currently limited by the lack of a taxonomy describing what occurs during a therapy session (with enough precision) to determine which techniques/components contribute most to treatment outcomes. To address this limitation, a classification system of voice therapy ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2015
A Taxonomy of Voice Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Nelson Roy
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Shaheen Awan
    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
  • Joseph Stemple
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Robert E. Hillman
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jarrad H. Van Stan: jvanstan@mghihp.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2015
A Taxonomy of Voice Therapy
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 101-125. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0030
History: Received March 6, 2014 , Revised June 30, 2014 , Accepted February 10, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 101-125. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0030
History: Received March 6, 2014; Revised June 30, 2014; Accepted February 10, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose Voice therapy practice and research, as in most types of rehabilitation, is currently limited by the lack of a taxonomy describing what occurs during a therapy session (with enough precision) to determine which techniques/components contribute most to treatment outcomes. To address this limitation, a classification system of voice therapy is proposed that integrates descriptions of therapeutic approaches from the clinical literature into a framework that includes relevant theoretical constructs.

Method Literature searches identified existing rehabilitation taxonomies/therapy classification schemes to frame an initial taxonomic structure. An additional literature search and review of clinical documentation provided a comprehensive list of therapy tasks. The taxonomy's structure underwent several iterations to maximize accuracy, intuitive function, and theoretical underpinnings while minimizing redundancy. The taxonomy was then used to classify established voice therapy programs.

Results The taxonomy divided voice therapy into direct and indirect interventions delivered using extrinsic and/or intrinsic methods, and Venn diagrams depicted their overlapping nature. A dictionary was developed of the taxonomy's terms, and 7 established voice therapy programs were successfully classified.

Conclusion The proposed taxonomy represents an important initial step toward a standardized voice therapy classification system expected to facilitate outcomes research and communication among clinical stakeholders.

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