Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy Versus Intensive Semantic Treatment in Fluent Aphasia Objective The authors compared the effectiveness of 2 intensive therapy methods: Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy (CIAT; Pulvermüller et al., 2001) and semantic therapy (BOX; Visch-Brink & Bajema, 2001). Method Nine patients with chronic fluent aphasia participated in a therapy program to establish behavioral treatment outcomes. Participants were randomly assigned ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 01, 2015
Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy Versus Intensive Semantic Treatment in Fluent Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ineke Wilssens
    ZNA Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Dorien Vandenborre
    Cepos, Rehabilitation Centre, Duffel, Belgium
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
  • Kim van Dun
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
  • Jo Verhoeven
    Language and Communication Sciences, City University London, United Kingdom
    Computational Linguistics and Psycholinguistics, University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium
  • Evy Visch-Brink
    Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  • Peter Mariën
    ZNA Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
  • The first two authors contributed equally to the article.
    The first two authors contributed equally to the article.×
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Peter Mariën: peter.marien5@telenet.be
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler
    Associate Editor: Daniel Kempler×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 01, 2015
Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy Versus Intensive Semantic Treatment in Fluent Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 281-294. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0018
History: Received January 29, 2014 , Revised August 25, 2014 , Accepted January 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 281-294. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0018
History: Received January 29, 2014; Revised August 25, 2014; Accepted January 22, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Objective The authors compared the effectiveness of 2 intensive therapy methods: Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy (CIAT; Pulvermüller et al., 2001) and semantic therapy (BOX; Visch-Brink & Bajema, 2001).

Method Nine patients with chronic fluent aphasia participated in a therapy program to establish behavioral treatment outcomes. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups (CIAT or BOX).

Results Intensive therapy significantly improved verbal communication. However, BOX treatment showed a more pronounced improvement on two communication—namely, a standardized assessment for verbal communication, the Amsterdam Nijmegen Everyday Language Test (Blomert, Koster, & Kean, 1995), and a subjective rating scale, the Communicative Effectiveness Index (Lomas et al., 1989). All participants significantly improved on one (or more) subtests of the Aachen Aphasia Test (Graetz, de Bleser, & Willmes, 1992), an impairment-focused assessment. There was a treatment-specific effect. BOX treatment had a significant effect on language comprehension and semantics, whereas CIAT treatment affected language production and phonology.

Conclusion The findings indicate that in patients with fluent aphasia, (a) intensive treatment has a significant effect on language and verbal communication, (b) intensive therapy results in selective treatment effects, and (c) an intensive semantic treatment shows a more striking mean improvement on verbal communication in comparison with communication-based CIAT treatment.

Acknowledgment
This study was performed at the Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
The first two authors contributed equally to the article.
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