Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates Purpose This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Method Two individuals ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2015
Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Edythe A. Strand
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Heather Clark
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Mary Machulda
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Jennifer L. Whitwell
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Keith A. Josephs
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Joseph R. Duffy: jduffy@mayo.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Diane Kendall
    Associate Editor: Diane Kendall×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2015
Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 88-100. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0174
History: Received October 4, 2014 , Revised December 13, 2014 , Accepted January 12, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 88-100. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0174
History: Received October 4, 2014; Revised December 13, 2014; Accepted January 12, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes.

Method Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers.

Results Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure.

Conclusions AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders Grants R01-DC010367, awarded to Keith A. Josephs, and R01-DC012519, awarded to Jennifer L. Whitwell.
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