Teaching Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Ask Inverted Yes/No Questions Using Aided Modeling Purpose This study investigated the effects of a direct intervention program involving aided modeling and the presentation of contrastive targets on the aided production of inverted yes/no questions and possible generalization to other sentence types by children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Method A single-case, multiple-probe, experimental ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2015
Teaching Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Ask Inverted Yes/No Questions Using Aided Modeling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Kent-Walsh
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Cathy Binger
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Carolyn Buchanan
    Crotched Mountain ATECH Services, Greenfield, NH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jennifer Kent-Walsh: jkentwalsh@ucf.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Brady
    Associate Editor: Nancy Brady×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2015
Teaching Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Ask Inverted Yes/No Questions Using Aided Modeling
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 222-236. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0066
History: Received May 14, 2014 , Revised October 3, 2014 , Accepted January 8, 2015
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2015, Vol. 24, 222-236. doi:10.1044/2015_AJSLP-14-0066
History: Received May 14, 2014; Revised October 3, 2014; Accepted January 8, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose This study investigated the effects of a direct intervention program involving aided modeling and the presentation of contrastive targets on the aided production of inverted yes/no questions and possible generalization to other sentence types by children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).

Method A single-case, multiple-probe, experimental design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of the instructional program with 3 children who had motor speech disorders and used AAC (ages 4;10 [years;months], 6;2, and 4;9). The treatment involved aided modeling of treatment and contrastive targets through concentrated modeling and interactive play activities. Direct treatment outcomes were examined by measuring the accuracy of producing inverted yes/no questions and to be declaratives through probes.

Results All 3 participants showed a direct treatment effect, producing a greater number of inverted yes/no questions and to be declaratives within the probes following treatment compared with before treatment. All 3 participants evidenced some generalization to novel sentences.

Conclusions Results provide initial evidence that instruction involving aided modeling with contrastive targets holds promise in targeting specific linguistic rules with children using AAC. Patterns of generalization may depend on participants' specific language deficits and acquisition patterns during intervention.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by funding from a clinical research grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (Rockville, MD), awarded to Jennifer Kent-Walsh, and from the Research and Mentoring Program through the Office of Undergraduate Research at the University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL). Preliminary results were presented at the Biennial Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Pittsburgh, PA, and complete findings were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, GA, and the Annual Convention of the Assistive Technology Industry Association in Orlando, FL. We thank student researchers Stephanie Amundsen, Venita Freia, Nicole Dickerson, and Jenny Arzt for their assistance with this project. We also thank the participating children and their parents who made this study possible.
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