Semantic–Syntactic Partial Word Knowledge Growth Through Reading Purpose Incidental reading provides a powerful opportunity for partial word knowledge growth in the school-age years. The extent to which children of differing language abilities can use reading experiences to glean partial knowledge of words is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare semantic–syntactic partial word ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 2015
Semantic–Syntactic Partial Word Knowledge Growth Through Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacy A. Wagovich
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Margaret S. Hill
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Gregory F. Petroski
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Stacy A. Wagovich: wagovichs@health.missouri.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Carol Miller
    Associate Editor: Carol Miller×
  • Copyright © 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 2015
Semantic–Syntactic Partial Word Knowledge Growth Through Reading
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2015, Vol. 24, 60-71. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-14-0046
History: Received March 27, 2014 , Revised July 19, 2014 , Accepted October 15, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2015, Vol. 24, 60-71. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-14-0046
History: Received March 27, 2014; Revised July 19, 2014; Accepted October 15, 2014

Purpose Incidental reading provides a powerful opportunity for partial word knowledge growth in the school-age years. The extent to which children of differing language abilities can use reading experiences to glean partial knowledge of words is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare semantic–syntactic partial word knowledge growth of children with higher language skills (HL group; overall language standard scores of 85 or higher) to that of children with relatively lower language skills (LL group; overall receptive or expressive standard score below 85).

Method Thirty-two children, 16 per group, silently read stories containing unfamiliar nouns and verbs 3 times over a 1-week period. Semantic–syntactic partial word knowledge growth was assessed after each reading and 2–3 days later to assess retention.

Results Over time, both groups showed significant partial word knowledge growth, with the HL group showing significantly more growth. In addition, both groups retained knowledge several days later.

Conclusion Regardless of language skill level, children benefit from multiple exposures to unfamiliar words in reading in their development and retention of semantic–syntactic partial word knowledge growth.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03DC006827-01A1, awarded to the first author. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the following students: Christine Franke, Janine Ingram, and Chesney Willis.
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